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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 144 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 14 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 12 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Chesapeake Bay (United States) or search for Chesapeake Bay (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Light Infantry, 1807-1861. (search)
The Washington Light Infantry, 1807-1861. The ante-bellum history of old Charleston's loyal sons was so continuously prominent in the annals of Charleston, for more than half a century, that it is only in order to refer very briefly to it here. Founded by William Lownes in 1807, upon receiving the news of the Leopard and Chesapeake affair, its roll of thirteen commanders down to 1861, reveals the character of its membership-Lowndes, Cross, Crafts, Simons, Miller, Gilchrist, Ravenel, Lee, Jervey, Porter, Walker, Hatch, Simonton. The public observance of Washington's birthday, by an oration and social functions, on 22d February, was an annual feature of W. L. I. life, and the annual response from the community indicated the highest public favor. This observance was continued up to and in the war period, the last celebration taking place in Fort Sumter while the command was part of the garrison of the gateway of Charleston, on the 22d of February, 1862. Referring to earlie
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Light Infantry Charitable Association, 1866. (search)
The Washington Light Infantry Charitable Association, 1866. The affair of the Leopard and Chesapeake involved no desecrated homes, no abandoned altars, no social insults, no unspeakable injuries—what wrongs perpetrated by England, can compare in results, with the storm of fiery desolation, that swept over our country, and left us, in 1865, from the seaboard to the mountains, in fettered destitution, without a home, without a country, and almost without a hope. The question of duty in 1860 repeated the demand of 1807; that of 1865 combined them both! What do my people need? Arms and a life! Let them be given! This was the question of 1807 and 1860—what do my people need? Bread and hope! This was the great question of 1865. Bread and hope were given, and something more was added. The bivouac of the dead was marked with a shaft of honor, that the stranger might know that the men who slept there died for their country! What heart and hand could do for the widow and orphan, w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
ast around him, who led his dashing battalion of horse to victory in many a bloody field? Who but our gallant Light horse Harry Gilmor, of Maryland, and peerless Ridgely Brown, slain in battle. Who was the brave soldier who commanded the Maryland Line, and, ever foremost in the fight, captured the famous Bucktail flag of the Pennsylvania regiment? It was Bradley T. Johnson, of Maryland! Who captured the first Federal flag of the war on the waters from the steamer St. Nicholas in Chesapeake bay? Colonel Richard Thomas Zarvona and Commodore Hollins—two Maryland men. And who was it that Jefferson Davis, the President of the Confederacy—he to whom this memorial is to be erected—who was it he called to his side in the flush of victory at glorious first Manassas and greeted before the whole army with Hail, the Blucher of the day? This was Arnold Elzey, of Maryland. And who shall tell of Trimble, commander of Stonewall Jackson's old division, and Steuart and Breathed, with hi<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The First Marine torpedoes were made in Richmond, Va., and used in James river. (search)
in the water every night, anchoring boats or beams ahead. Grew in favor. To obtain insulated wire an agent was sent to New York in secret, but failed, and as there was neither wire factory or insulating material in the South, the difficulties of preparing electrical torpedoes to which he attached the greatest importance and greatly preferred, seemed insuperable, until by a remarkable coincidence, in the following spring, it happened that the enemy attempting to lay a cable across Chesapeake Bay to Fortress Monroe were forced to abandon the attempt and left the wire to the mercy of the waves, which cast it up on the beach near Norfolk, where by the kindness of a friend, it was secured for Captain Maury's uses. With part of this he was enabled to mine James river below the obstruction with electrical torpedoes, which destroyed every Federal vessel that attempted to pass them, and kept their powerful fleet at bay during the entire war, and with part to enable other southern harb