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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Biographical sketch of Major-General Patrick. R. Cleburne. (search)
on the road, arrested every straggler and passing officer and soldier, collected a large force, organized fatigue parties, and literally lifted the trains over the hills. The trains thus preserved contained munitions and subsistence of the utmost value and necessity to the Confederates. It is by no means certain even that the army could have made its subsequent long march through a sterile and wasted country without them. In December, 1863, General Bragg concentrated his army at Murfreesboro, Tenn., to oppose the Federal forces assembled at Nashville under Rosecrans. At this time Major-General Buckner, then commanding the division of which Cleburne's Brigade formed a part, was transferred to other service, and the President of the Confederate States, who was on a visit to the army at that time, promoted Cleburne to the vacant division. Rosecrans' advance upon Bragg brought on the battle of Murfreesboro, December 31, 1862. In the action of this day Cleburne's was one of two di
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Zollicoffer's oak. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, August, 1903.] (search)
as made a brigadier-general in 1862, a major-general in 1865, was with Joseph E. Johnston at the final surrender in 1865, and was a member of the United States Senate at the time of his death in 1898. The 20th Tennessee at Missionary Ridge, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, won glorious immortality, while the 19th, 25th, 28th and 29th Tennessee at Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Jonesboro, Franklin, Nashville, in the Atlanta campaign wrested from fate superb renown. Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold, Jonesboro, Franklin, Nashville, in the Atlanta campaign wrested from fate superb renown. The 16th Alabama at Shiloh, Chickamauga, Ringgold, Jonesboro, Franklin, wrote in letters of blood a story of unsurpassed patriotic courage. The bodies of the Confederate soldiers, numbering in the neighborhood of 200, including the wounded which died, were placed in rows on the top of the ground, near Zollicoffer's oak, around them log pens were built and then covered over with earth, and so far as now known, the name of not a single hero who thus died is recorded. Into those log pens their
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
, Second Battle of, 278. Mangam, Lt. John H., 217. Manning, Colonel, Wade Hampton, 73. McNeill, Rangers of Captain John H., 12; Jesse. 12. Maryland's claims in the war, 209. Maury M. F., 326; Col. R. L., 326. Maxwell, John, 330. Miles, Colonel D. S., killed, 32. Miller, Captain, Wm. A., 2. Minor's Battery, 16; Captain Robert D., 327. Missionary Ridge, Battle of, 155. Mitchell, Geo. E., 124. Montague, Gov. A. J., 253. Morgan, General John H., killing of, 125. Murfreesboro, Battle of, 154. Napier on war, Lord, 318. Naval Brigade, 137. Negroes in the C. S. Army, 215, 365. New Market Battle of, commemorated at the V. M. I., 173; race-field, 20. North Carolina and Virginia in the War, 340; troops furnished by each, 343. Northern Va., Army of, its accomplish-ments, 280. O'Brien, Captain, wounded, 142. Otey, Bishop James H., 163. Palfrey, Gen F. W., 36. Parke, Gen. John G., 31. Parker, Captain W. H., 331. Pearce, Major S. A., 78.