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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 44 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall or search for Stonewall in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
Stonewall Jackson's death. [from the times-dispatch May 29, 1934.j Wounded by his own Men—Last order on the battlefield. The writer of the following article served under Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson in the war between the States. He says: General Lee's army was located on the south side of the Rappahannock river, near Fredericksburg, Va., in the winter of 1863. General Hooker's army was on the opposite side, 2nd in the early spring crossed the Rappahannock. On theheroic charge of the old Stonewall Brigade. He made inquiries concerning many officers and said: The men who live through this war will be proud to say, I was one of the Stonewall Brigade, to their children. He insisted that the term Stonewall belonged to the brigade and not to him. Tuesday his wounds were improving. He asked Dr. McGuire: Can you tell me from the appearance of the wounds, how long I will be kept from the field? When told he was doing remarkably well, he
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.45 (search)
ts' Day the offerings are made by relatives of each of the departed, members of the family circle; with us it is the undivided tribute of a whole people to all soldier dead. Here, too, the day is fitly chosen. Thirty-eight years ago to-day General Thomas J. Jackson, but a few days after his splendid achievement at Chancellorsville, in which he met his death wound, passed to his final reward. How many North Carolina boys were with him there, and many from him in death were not divided. Stonewall! the incarnation of the Confederate cause, of what was noblest in it, and knightliest and best—meet is it that the anniversary of his death should be set apart as the day for all to assemble to commemorate the cause he upheld so ably, and to do honor to the heroes who survive their great leader, as well as to those who with him have passed over the river and rest under the shade of the trees. Perpetuate, O, my fellow-countrymen! this beautiful custom—just tribute to devoted men and nob
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
ing spared just time enough to send to General Gregory an order to follow me with his brigade. In good season we reached the field where the fight was going on. Our cavalry had even then been driven to the very verge of the field by the old Stonewall Corps. Swinging rapidly into action the first line was sent forward in partial skirmish order, followed by the main lines, the 1st and 2d brigades. Once, for some unknown reason, I was ordered back, but in the impetuosity of youth and the hes Gregory's, in the rear, and across the street, facing the Third; the First Brigade also in line of battle. Having thus formed, the brigades standing at order arms, the head of the Confederate column, General Gordon in command, and the old Stonewall Jackson Brigade leading, started down into the valley which lay between us, and approached our lines. With my staff I was on the extreme right of the line, mounted on horseback, and in a position nearest the Rebel solders who were approaching