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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 769 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 457 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 436 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 431 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 371 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 295 5 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 277 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 234 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 203 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 180 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Joseph Hooker or search for Joseph Hooker in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg-Pickett's charge. (search)
t slaughter and was driven back bleeding and mangled to its place of safety. The star of Burnside went down and out. General Hooker was called to the command of the Army of the Potomac. After five months of recuperation and convalescence, with grea meet this great host Lee could rely for success only on the great art of war and the unfailing courage of his soldiers. Hooker crossed the Rappahannock and commenced to entrench himself. Lee did not wait to be attacked, but at once delivered battlIt was a question of statesmanship as well as of arms. The question was answered by Lee withdrawing his army from before Hooker and proceeding through the lower Shenandoah Valley to Pennsylvania, leaving the road to Richmond open to be taken by the ory to affect public opinion of the North, and thus to conquer peace. The first object was accomplished; for as soon as Hooker discerned the movement of Lee, he hastened to follow and to put his army between Lee and Washington. Had Lee gained a cr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee at Gettysburg. (search)
llorsville, the army of the Potomac, under General Hooker, was again gathering itself together. It said. In one of his picturesque dispatches to Hooker, he said: I would not take any risk of being e on the Potomac. Mr. Lincoln humorously wired Hooker: If the head of Lee's army is at Martinsburg, t, or at his discretion to move on the rear of Hooker to and across the Potomac, and as soon as possof Ewell's advance. Stuart passed the rear of Hooker's army and crossed the Potomac at Seneca, abou dash and gaiety, not on the west and north of Hooker, but using the discretion given him, on the east, between Hooker and Washington. He captured wagon trains, the nearest being but four miles fromching the South Mountains in Pennsylvania. As Hooker was without his cavalry at Chancellorsville, s him informed of the movements of all parts of Hooker's forces, A personal incident. A personaB. McClellan, John Pope, Ambrose Burnside, Joseph Hooker, George Meade, and Ulysses Grant, before w[6 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
nd gracious and hospitable. The latter part of April we broke camp, and on the 1st of May General Hooker crossed the Rappahannock between Fredericksburg, and Spotsylsvania, near Chancellorsville, nt in the provisional army of the Confederate States. To-day we are hurriedly notified that General Hooker, the successor of the unsuccessful Burnside, has effected a landing near Fredericksburg, ande as a day of thanksgiving and prayer for our recent great victory. Strange to say Fighting Joe Hooker issued a proclamation to his army after they had retreated across the river, congratulating them upon their great victory. How could General Lee and General Hooker both be victorious? I helped to bury Captain Cox of of Company B, Twelfth Alabama, at Grace Church this afternoon. He was a galla under his gallant leadership, and completely routed the panic-stricken soldiers of Fighting Joe Hooker. After Generals Jackson and A. P. Hill were wounded, General Rodes was in supreme command, but