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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Daniel Lee or search for Daniel Lee in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Some of the drug conditions during the war between the States, 1861-5. (search)
berries. Beech-tree leaves, collected in autumn in dry weather, were used for filling beds, the odor being grateful and they being very elastic. Black oak was considered efficacious in leucorrhoea, amenorrhoea, chronic hysteria, diarrhoea, rheumatism, cynanche, tonsillaris and asthma. The powder of the bark, mixed with lard, was a remedy in painful hemorrhoids, and used as a fomentation in prolapsus uteri and ani, and for deflections in these parts. I quote from an article of Dr. Daniel Lee, in the Southern Field and Fireside of 1860: It is poor economy for the South to destroy all its valuable tan-bark in clearing oak land, cutting rail timber and firewood, and thereby deprive our descendants of the power to manufacture their own leather. To send a million dollars worth of hides to the North, have them tanned into leather, made into shoes, boots, saddles and harness for Southern consumption, is to pay about eight million dollars for the support of that Northern economy wh