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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 41 41 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 27 27 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 14 14 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 10 10 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for July 21st, 1861 AD or search for July 21st, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Some war history never published. (search)
d, though you may not be able to advance into Maryland and expel the enemy, it may be possible to keep up the spirits of your troops by expectation, such as that particularly spoken of against Sickle's brigade on the lower Potomac, or Banks' above. By destroying the canal and making other rapid movements, to beat detachments or destroy lines of communication. * * * Very truly your friend, Jefferson Davis. The joyous exultation of the people over the victory at Manassas, on the 21st of July, 1861 (was followed by murmurs of dissatisfaction at what was termed a failure to reap the fruits of victory, and partizan zeal invented the excuse that the generals were prevented from pursuing the routed enemy and triumphantly entering his capital, by the untimely interference of the President, when this baseless fiction had been so utterly exploded that those who were responsible should have been ashamed of it; in due time another complaint arose, that patriotic citizens continued to be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), First battle of Manassas. (search)
First battle of Manassas. Dash and heroism of the Maryland line-stonewall Jackson's flank saved-recollections revived by the 45th anniversary. A paper read before the Isaac R. Trimble Camp, no. 1035, United Confederate Veterans, Baltimore, Md., October 2, 1906, by Colonel Winfield Peters, Maryland member of the Historical Committee, and on Southern School history, U. C. V. In the first Battle of Manassas, July 21, 1861, our First Maryland Regiment lastly and hotly engaged a brigade of the enemy from the edge of a woods overlooking a declivity, then a dry ditch at the foot, then a hill, on the crest of which the enemy was formed in battle line. We fired at point-blank range of, perhaps, 500 yards, awaiting reinforcements. The regiment was well dressed on the colors and the firing unobstructed, but the heat was intense, and the absence of wind prevented the smoke from rising; hence the view of the enemy's line was now and then obscured. Hairbreadth escape. In
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
s and Letters of R. E. Lee, by Robert E. Lee, Jr., page 38, and did not reach his headquarters at Valley Mountain until three days later (see same book). General McClellan at this time was in command of the Army of the Potomac, which he assumed on the 27th day of July (see History of the War of Rebellion, referred to, page 428); when General McClellan issues his first order as commanderinchief of that army. The great battle of Bull Run, or First Manassas, had been fought on the 21st day of July 1861, and the Confederates had gained a signal victory, and General McDowell's defeated and disorganized army was hurled back to Washington, and Mr. Lincoln and his Cabinet had sent to Randolph county with all haste for General McClellan, and when he reached Washington he was hailed as Napoleon, and Mr. Lincoln would jocularly tell his dishearted friends to wait and see what little Mac would do. Poor Lincoln! He never seemed to have realized what sorrow, what bloodshed, and what suffer
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
ings takes liberties with his orders and does good work. Colonel J. W. Allen's Report—Interesting recollections of deeds of valor at first Manassas battle. The fame of Stonewall Jackson overspread the Honey Hill combat at Manassas, 21st of July, 1861, but the reports of all his regimental commanders having been lost, no official record clarifies the movements and achievements of his five regiments on that day. The recent discovery and publication in The Times-Dispatch of Colonel Kenton brigade at the first battle of Manassas, but you must be satisfied at present with this. I should regret very much for any controversy to arise as to the part performed by any regiment of the brigade that was immortalized on the eventful 21st of July, 1861, when all behaved so gallantly and are entitled to the consolation of knowing that their full duty was well performed. But as you are an editor, though I may be over-cautious, I will ask, as there is no necessity of it, you will not make