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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,239 1,239 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 467 467 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 184 184 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 171 171 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 159 159 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 156 156 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 102 102 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 79 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 77 77 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 75 75 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1862 AD or search for 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 32 results in 14 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
General Lee's Strategy at the battle of Chancellorsville. A paper read by request before R. E. Lee Camp, no. 1, C. V., May 20th, 1906. By T. M. R. Talcott, Major and Aide de Camp to General R. E. Lee, in 1862-63, and later Colonel 1st Regiment Engineer Troops, A. N. V. [For the parole list of Engineer Troops surrendered at Appomattox C. H. and graphic account of the retreat from Petersburg, Va., see Vol. XXXII, Southern Historical Society Papers.—Ed.] Comrades of Lee Camp; The subject upon which you have called upon me to submit my personal recollections is not the Battle of Chancellorsville, on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th of May, 1863, in which the Federal Army of the Potomac, under General Hooker, which numbered more than 130,000 men, was defeated by a part of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, numbering less than 60,000 men, for history has already recorded how that field was fought and won. The hearing you have kindly afforded me as a member of the personal staff
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battlefields of Virginia. (search)
of operations, for every movement of an army must be well considered and properly ordered, and Jackson was too good a soldier to violate this fundamental military principle. Even when General Jackson was operating in the Valley of Virginia, in 1862, the movements of his command were a part of the general plan of operations, under the direction and control of General Lee as commanding general, as may be easily seen from the official correspondence between Lee and Jackson at that time. Coloneircumstances unknown to me, and requiring the exercise of discretion and judgment as to time and execution, but submit these ideas for your consideration. In commenting on the defects in the Federal strategy of exterior lines, in the spring of 1862, Colonel Henderson says: On April 29th, Johnston proposed to Mr. Davis that his army should be withdrawn from the Peninsula, and that the North should be invaded by way of the Valley. Lee, in the name of the President, replied that some suc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Historical memorial of the Charlotte Cavalry. (search)
The following is a chronological list of the engagements, large and small (excepting trivial encounters on picket and scout duty) in which this Company, as a whole or in part, participated during the War, with the casualties remembered. 1861. with Gen. R. S. Garnett in West Virginia. Laurel Hill, W. Va., July 7, 8 and 9. Kahler's Ford, W. Va., July 13. Carrick's Ford, W. Va., July 13. Swamp's Block House, W. Va., November—. Henry Chick killed and Isaac Friend wounded. 1862. with Gen. R. E. Lee in West Virginia. Dry Forks, W. Va., January 8. North Fork, W. Va., January 17. R. M. Friend wounded on scout. Hinkle's Gap, W. Va., February 4. Seneca Creek, W. Va., February—. North Mountain, W. Va., March 4. Samuel M. Gaines wounded. With Gen. Loring, Nicholas Court House, W. Va., July 26. Fayetteville, W. Va., September 10. Cotton Hill, W. Va., September 11. Montgomery's Ferry, W. Va., September 12. Charleston, W. Va., September 13.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
ed in an event which was fraught with so much moment to Richmond in the stirring times of the Civil War. The naval engagement here related is the one which prevented the men of war of the enemy from coming up to Richmond and bombarding the city in 1862. In treating the facts concerning the naval battle which occurred at Drewry's Bluff, May 15, 1862, I am aware that much controversy has arisen as to the true state of facts. The usual source of information is the official reports, but as theirst moment which I have felt that I could give any attention to your request, and even now I am forced to do so under circumstances which will not allow me to do justice to the matter in question. Nevertheless I submit the following: Early in 1862, when General McDowell was preparing for an advance upon Richmond from the direction of Fredericksburg, and General McClellan was moving up from the Peninsula, the Governor of Virginia was authorized by act of the Confederate Congress, then in ses
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), First battle of Manassas. (search)
ew exceptions, served faithfully to the end. whether re-enlisting or commissioned. The aggregate muster roll was about 120. With the First Maryland, they participated in General J. E. Johnston's Valley campaign, 1861; the Manassas campaign, 1861-1862; and in Stonewall Jackson's Valley campaign, 1862. Captain Wm. H. Murray of our H Company— the crack company of the regiment—was a young officer of exceptional merit and promise and greatly beloved. Leading his Company A, Second Maryland Infan1862. Captain Wm. H. Murray of our H Company— the crack company of the regiment—was a young officer of exceptional merit and promise and greatly beloved. Leading his Company A, Second Maryland Infantry, Captain Murray fell in the desperate charge at Gettysburg, the morning of July 3d, 1863. Gettysburg had no sublimer hero than Murray, the typical captain of the Maryland infantry. Major Goldsborough—intrepid and skillful—commanding the battalion, before advancing to the charge, said to him: Captain Murray, I have the most implicit confidence in your ability to lead our men. Take charge of the right wing: I will look after the left, as I know them better. Thus, on that bloody, fated
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Dahlgren raid. (search)
of this bold and questioning raid. For Dahlgren was no ordinary man. At this time he lacked but a month of being twenty-two years of age, but he was a seasoned veteran, and knew thoroughly the art of warfare. He was born near Philadelphia, April 3, 1842, the second son of Rear-Admiral John Adolph Dahlgren, the noted naval officer, author and scholar. He was educated in Washington, entered the war in 1861 as a captain, and had distinguished himself time after time for bravery in action. In 1862 he fought gallantly at Fredericksburg; and had made a desperate charge at Chancellorsville; at second Bull Run he had gained the admiration of all his fellow-officers, and had lost a leg in a desperate charge at Gettysburg. For his absolute fearlessness and bravery he had been promoted over the intermediate grades to Colonel, the commission having been personally brought to his bedside by Secretary Stanton. Now, in the spring of 1864, having recovered from his loss of limb, he was again at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
Demonstration on Harper's Ferry. From the Times-dispatch, December 9th, 1906. How Jackson Eluded Freemont and won three Fights in four days. Scouting in the Darkness—Famous Valley campaign of 1862—well—Laid plans that worked well. During the last week of May, 1862, my regiment, the Second Virginia Cavalry, commanded by Colonel T. T. Munford (afterward General Munford) was doing duty around Bolivar Heights, near Harper's Ferry. During the night of May 29th I was aroused byring most of the day and built fires as if we were going into camp. That night the army was in full motion up the Valley. I did not get back to my regiment until I got to Strasburg. Jackson slipped by Fremont a few days later, fought the battles of Harrisonburg, Cross Keys and Port Republic inside of four days, winding up his memorable Valley campaign of 1862. This was the opening of that great campaign, and led to the movement to Richmond. A. D. Warwick, Late 1st Lieut. 2d Va. Regi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
Weeks, Henry Winfield, W. R. Wilkes, William H. Widgins, J. W. Williams. Editor Times-Dispatch: Sir—Referring to a statement in a recent issue of your paper, that the battleflag of the 13th Virginia Cavalry, captured at Poolesville, Md., in 1862, had been returned to the State, I beg to state that the 13th Virginia Cavalry didn't participate in the Maryland campaign in 1862; that its fine service with the army of Northern Virginia proper, was in the fall after that campaign. The companieinia Cavalry, captured at Poolesville, Md., in 1862, had been returned to the State, I beg to state that the 13th Virginia Cavalry didn't participate in the Maryland campaign in 1862; that its fine service with the army of Northern Virginia proper, was in the fall after that campaign. The companies for most part doing separate duty between Petersburg and Norfolk, a battalion, doing duty on James river, as a body. L. R. Edwards, Late Lieutenant, Company A, 13th Virginia Cavalry. Franklin, Va
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Smith, Governor of Virginia, and Major-General C. S. Army, hero and patriot. (search)
Sept. 6, 1797. Died May 18, 1887. 1836-40 1841-2 Member of Virginia Senate. 1846-49 Governor of Virginia. 1841-3 1853-1861 Member of United States Congress. 1861-62 Member of Confederate States Congress. 1861-2 Colonel Forty-ninth Virginia Volunteers. 1862-3 Brigadier-General of Confederate States Army. 1863-4 Major-General C2 Colonel Forty-ninth Virginia Volunteers. 1862-3 Brigadier-General of Confederate States Army. 1863-4 Major-General Confederate States Army. 1864-5 Governor of Virginia. Second face: A man of strong convictions, bred in the strict States' Right school, He yielded paramount allegiance to his mother State, And maintained, with fearless and impassioned eloquence, In the Congress of the United States the Sovereignty of Virginia, When the 1862-3 Brigadier-General of Confederate States Army. 1863-4 Major-General Confederate States Army. 1864-5 Governor of Virginia. Second face: A man of strong convictions, bred in the strict States' Right school, He yielded paramount allegiance to his mother State, And maintained, with fearless and impassioned eloquence, In the Congress of the United States the Sovereignty of Virginia, When the storm of war burst, His voice was in his sword. Third face: Though past threescore, he entered the military service As Colonel of Virginia Infantry, And rose by sheer merit to the rank of Major-General. At First Manassas, Seven Pines, the Seven Days Battle, Cedar Mountain, Second Manassas, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Ch
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.25 (search)
presentation and return to them. Pike county sent out eleven companies, besides Garland's Battalion, into the Confederate service. Preston Brent, who organized the Quitman Guards in 1859, also organized the Brent Rifles and took them out in 1862. He became colonel of the Thirty-eighth Mississippi Regiment and was severely wounded at the siege of Vicksburg, in 1863. Thomas R. Stockdale, who acted as one of the escorts to the young ladies at the presentation of the banner, was major of y Governor McLaurin. H. Eugene Weathersby was a graduate of Centenary College, La., in a class with Judge T. C. W. Ellis, of the Civil District Court, and went out as a lieutenant in Captain John T. Lamkin's company, organized at Holmesville in 1862, of the Thirty-third Regiment, and was killed at the battle of Franklin, Tenn., November 30, 1864. He was a son of Dr. Solomon Weathersby and Martha Jane Bennett, of Amite county. His grand-parents were immigrants from South Carolina, and came t
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