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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 46 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jedediah Hotchkiss or search for Jedediah Hotchkiss in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
riginated the movement of Jackson's corps to the rear of Hooker, and gave Col. Charles Marshall's account of the matter. Subsequently, in 1886, General A. L. Long, in his Memoirs of R. E. Lee, gave his own recollections of how Jackson's movement originated, and corroborated them by a letter from General Lee to Dr. A. T. Bledsoe, written in October, 1867, and an extract from a personal letter from me. In 1867 an account was published of the Battle of Chancellorsville by Messrs. Allan and Hotchkiss, the former of whom was the Chief of Ordnance of the Second Corps, and the latter also attached to General Jackson's staff, from which I extract the following, which differs materially from Dr. Dabney's account of the conference between Lee and Jackson and other occurrences which preceded the flank movement around Hooker, but accords to General Jackson the strategical conception of the movement of his corps, as well as the tactical skill with which it was executed, and the attack made.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battlefields of Virginia. (search)
death Lieutenant-General Jackson. by Jed. Hotchkiss, Late Captain and Topographical Engineer, 1897: About daylight on May 2nd, says Major Hotchkiss, General Jackson awakened me, and requestsir. Condensing the account of Allan and Hotchkiss, the principal facts stated are: 1. Lee aoker's rear. * * *. In his last account, Hotchkiss claimed to have obtained information (on theold turnpike near the Wilderness tavern, and Hotchkiss' map shows that this was the route followed tart on the morning of Saturday, May 2nd. Hotchkiss representation that there was time for him ay until the next morning; yet we are told by Hotchkiss that no plan of attack was decided on, and n rear until the morning of May 2nd, when he (Hotchkiss) obtained information of a hitherto unknown urally look for such information, and not to Hotchkiss, who was one of Captain Boswell's subordinathink, shown that the evidence is all against Hotchkiss' account of how the movement of Jackson arou[11 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
Here Sheridan ordered a return to Winchester, without attempting a battle. On this countermarch the enemy destroyed over 2,000 barns, 100 mills, and every grain, hay and fodder stack for sixty-five miles, and telegraphed General Grant that a crow flying down the Valley would have to carry his own rations. In the light of burning barns, mills and grain stacks, Early followed to Woodstock, and rested his army, his front at Fisher's Hill. On the morning of the 18th General Gordon and Captain Hotchkiss rode to the signal station on Massanutton Mountain, and they found that Wright's army had been weakened by at least a corps, and that it had been removed to White Post, about twelve miles northeast of Strasburg. General Early was notified, and also viewed the position. Returning to camp, he assembled his major-generals, and a council of war determined upon a daylight attack—Gordon in command of the second corps, composed of Evans', Ramseur's and Pegram's divisions. He was to turn