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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 92 4 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 72 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 19 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 12 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 11 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Eppa Hunton or search for Eppa Hunton in all documents.

Your search returned 48 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gives full record. (search)
mes-Dispatch. Sir,—I will say that I was a member of Company E, Eighteenth Virginia Regiment, Hunton's Brigade, Pickett's Division. I knew Comrade S. W. Paulett very well. I have made many long ald, and I would like to say that the Thirty-second Virginia Regiment was at one time attached to Hunton's Brigade, and that was in the fall and winter of 1863-64. Hunton's Brigade, with the rest of tHunton's Brigade, with the rest of the division, came from Orange county to the vicinity of Richmond about the first of October, 1863. Hunton's Brigade went to Chaffin's farm, eight miles below Richmond, and went in quarters vacated byHunton's Brigade went to Chaffin's farm, eight miles below Richmond, and went in quarters vacated by Wise's men. In about two weeks the Eighteenth Virginia Regiment was sent to Petersburg to do provost duty in the town; at the same time we relieved the Thirty-second Virginia Regiment, who had been dreer as an active Confederate soldier came to an end. M. J. Moore, Formerly of Company E, 18th Virginia Regiment, Hunton's Brigade, Pickett's Division, Longstreet's Corps. Gig, Va., September, 1906
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
Jenifer, who was in command of the field until Hunton arrived, says he never witnessed more coolnessdds, with ammunition and men nearly exhausted, Hunton had done all that was possible at this time; a to make a desperate stand, said to them, Tell Hunton to hold on till every d——n man falls. I have n's report In his report of this charge Colonel Hunton says: I gave the order to cease firing forlucher had come to give the coup de grace. Hunton's charge having driven the enemy across the ophe Howitzers to be very careful not to fire on Hunton's men, who would be the first running out of tf his command from Gorman's front to reinforce Hunton at the critical juncture he evinced strategic wing, in strong position, in conjunction with Hunton's splendid dash against their centre, and no o, and it was decided that White should ride to Hunton's headquarters, explain the situation, and asks very near his front line and within range of Hunton's muskets, and thereby rendered them useless. [30 more...]<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
sburg by the late Col. Joseph Mayo, of the Third Virginia Infantry, Kemper's brigade. This gallant officer was a Virginia Military Institute man, and like every other field officer of Pickett's division, without a single exception, he was stricken in the dreadful assault. It has sometimes been said that all of Pickett's field officers were wounded except Major Joseph C. Cabell, of Danville. This is a mistake. He also was shot in the charge, though not severely. It was stated that Col. Eppa Hunton, of the Eighth Virginia Infantry, Garnett's brigade, rode his horse throughout the action until both he and his horse were shot. Having his painful wound attended, he turned to ride forward again when his horse fell dead. The account is a graphic one and bears the impress of truth. Col. J. B. Bachelder, in his account of Gettysburg, states that Pickett's men chased the enemy beyond the point where Armistead fell. Col Mayo's account tells the story of a private who fell twenty
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Berkeley brothers from the Richmond News-leader, January 21, 1907. (search)
her, Major William Berkeley, who lives in Richmond, was major of the regiment. Still a fourth brother, the late Captain Charles Berkeley, was a senior captain in the Eighth. Famous for its heroism. This remarkable organization, that became known throughout the Confederate army for its heroism, was composed of five companies from Loudoun County, three companies from Fauquier County, one company from Prince William County, and one from Fairfax County. It was under the command of Colonel Eppa Hunton, who was made brigadier-general after the death of General Richard Garnett at Gettysburg. Pickett, in his immortal charge at Gettysburg, had three brigades, commanded, respectively, by General Garnett, General Armistead and General Kemper, who afterward became Governor of Virginia. General Garnett was killed in the battle, General Armistead was mortally wounded, and General Kemper was crippled for life. In the Eighth Virginia the three Berkeley brothers—Edmund, Norborne and Wil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
nce R., 194. Hayes Colonel R. G., His report of Captured Stuff, 297. Henderson, cited, Colonel, 20 Henley, Captain R. L, Gallantry of, 251. Herndon, Dr., Brodie Strauchan, 42. Hill, Tribute to General Lee, by B. H. 351. Hoffman, Com. Gen. of Prisoners, Col., 40. Holmes, Colonel, Oliver Wendell, 273. Hooker, general, Joseph, 1, 206, 209. Horner, Mrs., Kate Arnold, 29. Hotchkiss, Major, Jed., 2. Howitzers, Richmond, 29, 364. Hunter, Major Robert W., 254, 359. Hunton, General, Eppa, 261. Imboden, General J. D., 293. Imboden Raid and its effects, 295. Jackson, General T. J., 1; Glowing apostrophe to, 55; at Harper's Ferry in 1861, 202. Jackson, General W. L., Mudwall, 213, 294, 301. Jenifer, Lieutenant-Colonel, 259. Johnson's Island Prison, 39; Rations at, 43; Religious services at, 46; Lines Exchanged on, 47. Johnson, General, Bradley Tyler, 176. Johnston, General J. E. 133; Surrender and disbanding of forces of, 124. Jones, Lieutenant, Ap