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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 2 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 23 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 22 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charles Marshall or search for Charles Marshall in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
ieutenant-General Thomas J. Jackson, in which Dr. R. L. Dabney stated that at a conference between Lee and Jackson on the night of May 1st, 1863, General Jackson proposed to throw his command entirely into Hooker's rear. But it was not until the Ninth Annual Re-union of the Association, in October, 1879, that General Fitzhugh Lee, in his address on Chancellorsville, endeavored to settle the question as to who originated the movement of Jackson's corps to the rear of Hooker, and gave Col. Charles Marshall's account of the matter. Subsequently, in 1886, General A. L. Long, in his Memoirs of R. E. Lee, gave his own recollections of how Jackson's movement originated, and corroborated them by a letter from General Lee to Dr. A. T. Bledsoe, written in October, 1867, and an extract from a personal letter from me. In 1867 an account was published of the Battle of Chancellorsville by Messrs. Allan and Hotchkiss, the former of whom was the Chief of Ordnance of the Second Corps, and the l
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battlefields of Virginia. (search)
oad, and a little distance in the woods. Colonel Marshall, the well-known aidede-camp of General Leetter to Mr. Davis, dictated by General Lee. Marshall sat on the end of a fallen tree, within threehen withdrew, and General Lee dictated to Colonel Marshall a long letter to President Davis, giving as soon in a happy state of oblivion. Colonel Marshall is not entirely accurate in the account het at these people? For in light of what Colonel Marshall has said, it seems probable that this queoisance in Hooker's front was made. What Colonel Marshall says passed between Lee and Jackson must n previously discussed in the presence of Colonel Marshall, as to what could be done in case an attadefenses in front of Chancellorsville. Colonel Marshall seems also to be mistaken in saying that of a letter the night of May 1st, such as Colonel Marshall says was dictated by General Lee to Mr. Dthe Furnace and Brock roads, as stated by Colonel Marshall, and the fact that General Jackson did fo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Smith, Governor of Virginia, and Major-General C. S. Army, hero and patriot. (search)
earliest infancy, his mind was fed and his character formed with stories of heroic deeds. At the fireside he would hear recounted incidents of the stern struggle for freedom in which all with whom he was brought into association were engaged. The mighty figure of Washington still lingered upon the stage; Light-Horse Harry Lee, the hero of the Southern campaigns, great in himself, but to be remembered in all coming time as the father of Robert Edward Lee; and Jefferson, Madison, Monroe and Marshall were at the zenith of their great careers while William Smith was in the tender and receptive days of his early youth. What lessons he learned! What examples he saw around him! What inspiration to form his ideals upon that which is noble in life, and what incentives to high achievement! In order to rouse his ambition, to kindle the sacred fire in his soul, there was no need to turn to books of chivalry or romance, to pore over Plutarch's Lives or Livy's pictured page. It was a saying o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
his cheek. I tried to save him, but he would not give up, so I had to kill him to save my own life. What orders do you leave us, my lord, if you are killed? asked Hill of Wellington when the pounding was hardest on the famous plateau at Waterloo. Do as I am doing, he replied, and turning to the men, he said, Boys, you can't think of giving away. Remember old England. And well it was for old England that behind the Iron Duke was a wall of iron men. Calling to the group around me to spread themselves, I led the way back to the woods in rear of our guns on Seminary Ridge. Realizing painfully our own sad plight, we were, of course, anxiously concerned for the rest of our people. But soon Mars Robert came along, followed by his faithful aides, the two Charleses-Venable and Marshall. How ineffably grand he appeared — a very anointed king of command, posing for the chisel of a Phidias, and looking on him we knew that the army was safe. So ended our part in the day's bloody work
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
281; Emancipation, 311. Lipscomb, Captain, Martin Meredith, 187. Long, General A. L., 2, 15 Louisiana, Purchase of, 61. Lynch, Wilson B., 149. McClellan, General Geo B., Career of, 284. McNeil, John A., 280, 294. Manassas, First Battle of, Heroism of the Maryland Line at, 170; 33rd Va. Infantry at, 363. Mann, Sergeant S. A., 97. March, Confederates in shortest time, 248. Marr, Captain, John Quincy, killed, 225. Maryland, Career of the first regiment, 172. Marshall, Colonel, Charles, 17. Marshall, Col. Thos. Children of, adopted by Mrs. Susan Lees, 36 Massie, Lieutenant Fletcher T., 243. Mayo, Colonel, Joseph, 327. Mayo, Mrs W. C., 354. Meredith, Sergeant, Fleming, 186. Milroy, General R. H., Capture of command of, 298. Minor, Dr., James Madison, 36. Moore, M. J., 249 Morris, General T. A. 289. Morrison, Colonel E. M., 250. Morson, James M., 355. Munford, General T T, 200. Murray, Captain W. H., 176; Services of his Company, 177; Monumen