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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 31 7 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 17 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 13 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Corse or search for Corse in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Eighth Virginia's part in second Manassas. (search)
enemy from hillock to hill, until finally they broke from Fairfax Courthouse for Washington. We wanted to see our friends in Maryland, so turned north by the Fryingpan Road, and at night stopped near the home of some of my men. Colonel, a man would say to me, my wife and children are just over that hill. I have not heard of them for months. Please get permission for me to go for a little while; I will surely be back before you move. Hardly knowing what to do, the next morning, I went to General Corse (we were happy to be under this gallant man even for a short time), and explained the situation to him. You are right, said he, but you must have General Longstreet's permission. He has just passed up the road. I put out after him, and found him, dismounted and alone. I asked permission to send out one or two men to warn some absentees, as we were about to move. Not a man, said he; better hold on to all you have got. These men joined us before night. We needed them.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Further Recollections of second Cold Harbor. (search)
ut overlooked the fact that it was a game two could play. After standing it as long as possible, they turned loose all their guns on our lines. Looking for General Corse. We infantry boys did surely hug the ground. General Corse, our brigadier, had been near us just before the fuss commenced. My colonel, Montague, Major B.General Corse, our brigadier, had been near us just before the fuss commenced. My colonel, Montague, Major B. P. Lee and myself had picked out the safest place we could find, when all of a sudden the colonel said to me, Bidgood, where is General Corse? Go out, find him and ask him to come with us. I looked at the colonel and said to myself, Does he want to get rid of his sergeant-major this way? The shells were coming as thick as hailGeneral Corse? Go out, find him and ask him to come with us. I looked at the colonel and said to myself, Does he want to get rid of his sergeant-major this way? The shells were coming as thick as hail, bursting and kicking up such dust as no tornado could. However, when the colonel ordered it, and it was my duty to obey, I started to find the general, but as Old Grand Dad, as we called him, was a wise man as well as a good general, he had doubtless selected a safe place. I dodged the shells and took a hasty look, but nothing
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
5. Carey, Misses made Confederate flag, 256. Carter, Lt. Robert. 50. Carrington J. McDowell, 337. Cemetery Ridge, 150 Chambersburg, The burning of, 152, Christian, Col. C. B.. 236. Clay, Clement C., 249. Cobb, Gen. Howell, 18. Cold Harbor, Recollections of Second Battle of, 319. Color Episode of the 149th Pennsylvania Volunteers, 266. Cloyd's Mountain, Recollections of Battle of 349. Confederate Flag, how it was devised, 235. Cook, Capt. John D. S., 195. Corse, Gen., Old Grand Dad, 320. Cowan, Col. Andrew, 194. Crater, Battle of, 208; Who gave order to charge at, 204. Crocker, Hon. J. F., 185, 194; Personal experiences of, 257. Curtin, Hon. A. G., 248. Cushing, Caleb, 42. Cuyler, Lt. Col. R. M., 16. Dahlgren, War-time story of, 198; Defeat of Raid of, 351. Daniel, Hon. John W., 172. Davis, Jefferson. Statement as to causes of his long imprisonment, 243; Reward for arrest of 249. Dearing, Jim, Boy Brigadier, 70, 313.