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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 78 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 76 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 44 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 44 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 42 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Cashtown (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Cashtown (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 32 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stuart's cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
command and our main body, preventing any communication with him until he arrived at Carlisle. Second report: (nothing). (7) The march towards Gettysburg was slower than it would have been if the movements of the Federal army had been known. First report: The march towards Gettysburg was conducted more slowly than it would have been if the movements of the Federal army had been known. Second report: General Ewell was recalled from Carlisle and directed to join the army at Cashtown or Gettysburg, as circumstances might require. The adance of the enemy to the latter place was unknown, and the weather being inclement the march was conducted with a view to the comfort of the troops. (8) Intelligence of Stuart's arrival at Carlisle was received on July 1st, after Hill had met the enemy. First report: The leading division of General Hill met the enemy in advance of Gettysburg on the morning of July 1st. During the afternoon intelligence was received of the arriv
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
be seen that evening on the mountain side at Cashtown, by Buford's pickets, who advanced some milessburg, and the subsequent order to proceed to Cashtown or Gettysburg as circumstances might dictate,n the 29th I moved General Heth's division to Cashtown, some eight miles from Gettysburg, following n on the morning of July 1st. On arriving at Cashtown, General Heth, who had sent forward Pettigrew corps moved on the 29th from Fayetteville to Cashtown, at the east base of South Mountain, where itrted from General Lee's plan in moving beyond Cashtown. He contends that this place and not Gettysb all against him. Ewell was directed towards Cashtown or Gettysburg, as circumstances might requirekless and unauthorized; had he stood still at Cashtown, he would have blocked the passage of Longstr to make it appear that Hill's advance beyond Cashtown was unauthorized, in the light of these facts, Rodes' division, moving in the direction of Cashtown, was turned to the left at Middletown, and it[6 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel James Gregory Hodges. (search)
ear a grand account of the regiment and I am proud to say that it has always done well, and in some instances far excelled those they were thrown with. Pickett's division pushed hurriedly on to catch up with Lee's advancing army. The division was at Chambersburg on the 1st day of July engaged in ordinary camp drill, while Lee's advancing forces were engaged in severe battle at Gettysburg. It left the next morning for Gettysburg, and arriving in the afternoon at a camping ground between Cashtown and Gettysburg. Only three brigades of the division were present, Kemper's, Garnett's and Armistead's. The field officers of the Fourteenth Virginia were, at this time, Col. James Gregory Hodges, Lieut. Col. William White, Major Robert Poore, and Adjutant John S. Jenkins. Early on the morning of July 3 these brigades were taken to the battle line. I will not undertake here to describe Pickett's charge. This was done in an address delivered before this camp on November 7, 1894, published
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
visions of the 3rd Corps began their march to Cashtown, then the probability of its correctness becommanding to join the main body of the army at Cashtown. Again, it appears that Johnson's reserve 30th to order Hill and Longstreet to march to Cashtown. There is the improbability that an order offter that officer received orders to march to Cashtown, or certainly before day break of the 30th. in front of Lee's army, then concentrated at Cashtown. And he adds that in that case Lee's army wold have occupied some strong position between Cashtown and Gettysburg, and the onus of attack would have been available in the march from York to Cashtown on the 30th, and in the operations on the fathe orders Lee had issued for concentration at Cashtown, and he would have marched that day with Early towards Cashtown. his cavalry would in all probability have prevented the rash advance of General ange of plan and the orders to concentrate at Cashtown were not the consequence of the intelligence [1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heth intended to cover his error. (search)
red the army to Gettysburg he would have been with the leading division and would have occupied the place several days before, instead of halting Hill's corps at Cashtown. There was more reason for censuring Lee for being absent from the field than Stuart. It is impossible to believe that General Lee ever professed the ignorere not blind — they knew the enemy held Gettysburg; so they did not need cavalry to tell them. They evidently expected to bag a few thousand Yankees, return to Cashtown, and present them to General Lee that evening. But to use a common expression they bit off more than they could chaw. They left Cashtown at 5 in the morning infew thousand Yankees, return to Cashtown, and present them to General Lee that evening. But to use a common expression they bit off more than they could chaw. They left Cashtown at 5 in the morning in as gay spirits as John Gilpin's when he started off to Edmonton to have a wedding feast. It was after all not much of a feas