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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 29 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stuart's cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
ays nothing about Ewell having gone several days in advance into Pennsylvania; and that Stuart was ordered to join him with three brigades of ays nothing about Ewell having gone several days in advance into Pennsylvania. It was not that Ewell advanced ahead of time, but that Stuart n. The columns reunited at Hagerstown, and advanced thence into Pennsylvania, encamping near Chambersburg on the 27th. No report had been reright flank of the two corps that were with Lee, or to move into Pennsylvania and join Ewell on the Susquehanna. It merely advised General Ewe Early's division and enable Ewell to move his whole corps into Pennsylvania, with Jenkins' cavalry in advance and Imboden on his left. If Hthat justifies Col. Mosby's inference that Stuart was to move to Pennsylvania and join Ewell on the Susquehanna, or to justify his statement otime at Carlisle, and Longstreet's and Hill's corps were also in Pennsylvania at Chambersburg, having, as General Lee says, advanced so far wi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
General Lee then asked him if he did not think an invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania would accomplish the same results, to which he replied he did not see that iis mental attitude, and indicate an unwillingness to enter upon the Maryland-Pennsylvania campaign before it began. They also reveal an aggressive attitude on the padeep sense of disappointment over Stuart's absence during all the march into Pennsylvania, and a disposition to hold him strictly to account. It is equally true thatThe next morning, June 30th, the march was resumed in a direct line for Hanover, Pa. Here a considerable body of cavalry was encountered, which had to be disposed ofs from the South, in General Lee's estimation, as an extended excursion into Pennsylvania, and threatening the capital of that State. To return to the Army of the mplished by the relief of Harrisburg, and the prevention of the invasion of Pennsylvania beyond the Susquehanna, and it was no longer his intention to assume the off
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
The burning of Chambersburg. From Pennsylvania-German, July, 1909. note.—This article, published in the Baltimore American, March 28, 1909, and written by Lieut. Fielder C. Slingluff, who was a member of the First Maryland Cavalry, C. S. A., and is now a prominent lawyer, citizen, clubman and churchman of Baltimore, Md., was sent for publication by Captain Frederick M. Colston, of the same place. The letter, beside the following: As an act of simple justice and for historical accuracy, I ask you to publish this, as an addenda to the Rev. Dr. Seibert's account of the burning of Chambersburg, contained a clipping from the Baltimore Sun of April 26, 1909, as follows: Sheridan, like Sherman, indulged his proclivities for pillage and destruction only after the last vestige of Confederate military organization had vanished from his front, and it was on a people incapable of armed resistance that vengeance was wreaked. Some idea of the pitiless and wanton devastation wrought in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel James Gregory Hodges. (search)
that arose among the cadets; and such was the cadets' great admiration and respect for their high character and judgment that all readily acquiesced in their decisions. He chose medicine as his profession and graduated at the University of Pennsylvania. He gained great success and eminence in his profession. During the yellow fever in 1855 he gave untiring and faithful devotion to the sick day and night from the beginning to the end of the epidemic. He was elected mayor of the city of P our forces, but it was not actively engaged. It wintered at Guinea Station on the Richmond and Fredericksburg road. In the spring it was ordered to Suffolk, from there it was ordered to join Lee's army, then ready to commence its march into Pennsylvania. Col. Hodges, writing on the 9th of June, 1863, from Spotsylvania county, says: We left Hanover Junction yesterday morning and have proceeded forty miles on our way to join Gen. Lee, either in Culpeper county or beyond if he has crossed the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
or General Geo. H. Stewart 50 miles by daylight on June 23rd, in Pennsylvania. But on the supposition that Ewell received that famous letter g, and next morning Rodes and Johnson commenced their march into Pennsylvania.] This order was repeated in a letter to General Stuart datedrepresents that General Lee instructed General Stuart to move to Pennsylvania and join Ewell on the Susquehanna, (p. 88.) Throughout the wholeed to proceed with all dispatch to join the right of the army in Pennsylvania. In his zeal to justify General Stuart, Colonel Mosby has misg, to proceed with all dispatch to join the right of the army in Pennsylvania. Colonel Mosby himself says: The object was to go the most dict of his expedition, which was to join the right of the army in Pennsylvania on its march towards the Susquehanna. These observations receanner? In so critical and fateful a movement as the invasion of Pennsylvania, it was supremely important that every officer should carry out
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Affidavit of Supervisors of Co. C, 149th regiment. Pa. Vols. (search)
Affidavit of Supervisors of Co. C, 149th regiment. Pa. Vols. State of Pennsylvania, County of Lebanon—ss. Personally appeared before me a Justice of the Peace in and for said county, Edward L. Manderbach, William H. Reigart, John Schaeffer, Lorenzo Blecker, Adam Loose and Henry W. Moyer, who being duly affirmed according to law, do depose and say, that they were present in the first Day's Fight, at Gettysburg, and that the regimental colors were never again returned to the custody of the Company after being sent out into the field north of the pike and planted by a rail-pile to the left of the left front of the regiment, and that there, at said rail-pile, was the last we saw of them. Affirmed and subscribed before me, this 25th day of May, A. D. , 1907. H. S. Gockley, Justice of the Peace. Edward L. Manderbach, William H. Reigart, John Schaeffer, Lorenzo Blecker, Adam Loose, Henry W. Moyer. These accounts harmonize so completely as to leave them free from all doubt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
or any unjust criticism upon him. I had also great respect for General Gordon, and admiration for that distinguished officer. I believe he was the best citizen soldier of the war. If he had been educated at West Point, great as his achievements were, there is no telling what more he might have accomplished in the military line. He was daring and absolutely fearless in battle, and a most thorough and accomplished gentleman. General Early's enforced contribution. When we went into Pennsylvania, of course, my battery moved with Early's Division, and we finally, on June 2, 1863, landed in the Fair Grounds of York, without any incident worthy of mention here. In that city we were treated with much kindness by many of its citizens, and there I met friends and acquaintances who were cordial and hospitable. General Gordon, in his article in Scribner's of July 1903, refers to the fact that General Early levied a contribution upon the citizens of York to satisfy the urgent necessitie
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
, and fought, and fought, till they wore out the opposition. But whom did they fight, and how? The Army of Northern Virginia is to pass through Maryland into Pennsylvania. Strict orders are given that all private property is to be respected, and noncombatants are in no way to be molested. The orders are signed by R. E. Lee, Geeet in Petersburg hundreds of those who resisted them. These visitors will be welcomed with genuine hospitality. On Virginia soil a monument to soldiers from Pennsylvania will be unveiled, for they fought for the right as it was given them to see the right, and we can forgive their blindness. We can respect brave men who made a, where they lie buried, this stone is erected to their everlasting honor in the heart of the Confederacy. Virginia can afford a monument for brave men from Pennsylvania. It is said that 6,000 bullets shot by Federal and Confederate soldiers will be in evidence in Petersburg, and that the menu cards will each have a Confederat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heth intended to cover his error. (search)
field than Stuart. It is impossible to believe that General Lee ever professed the ignorance of the movements of Stuart that Heth, Long, and his staff-officers have attributed to him. If he had done so, it would have been affectation. He knew that his and Longstreet's orders would carry Stuart for a while into a state of eclipse; around the enemy, out of sight, and out of communication with him. Heth delivered the judgment in his letter that the failure to crush the Federal army in Pennsylvania can be expressed in five words—the absence of cavalry; I would rather say it was due to the presence of Heth. The much-mooted letter-book. In another letter in the Philadelphia Times of December 27, 1877, Heth professes to have read in General Lee's letter-book his instructions to Stuart to keep in close contact and communication with Longstreet. Now the contents of the letter-book have since been published and I have read the original copies. Heth's account of what he read in