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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 298 44 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 252 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 126 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 90 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 69 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Warren or search for Warren in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
, says his troops were about half way between the artillery of the 2d corps and that on Cemetery Hill, that while on the lookout for a favorable opportunity to attack, and having notified Ewell he was about to do so, and just as he was about to give the order to advance, it was announced and was apparent to him that the attack had already failed. Outside of the artillery, the attack was made on the part of the Confederates by two divisions and a half, out of nine divisions in the army. General Warren, in his testimony before the Committee on the Conduct of the War, stated that Meade had nearly half his army in a good and sheltered position on his left, from where he could conveniently reinforce other points on the lines, and that when the repulse took place, Meade intended to move forward all the forces he could get, and in turn assault the enemy. That he ordered the advance of the 5th corps, but it was carried out so slowly it did not amount to anything. The Confederates anticipat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
New Jersey, and Governor Fort, of New Jersey, accepted it and transferred it to the Fifteenth Regiment Association. The acceptance speech was made by Theodore F. Swayze, after the singing of Columbia. The principal address of the occasion was made by State Senator Joseph S. Freelinghuysen, of Raritan, N. J., who received much applause. In referring to the Fifteenth Regiment, Senator Freelinghuysen said: It was recruited from five of the northern counties—Rundeston, Sussex, Somersex, Warren and Morris. They came from plow and workshop, from desk and pulpit, the flower of mankind, eager at their country's call. With banners flying they marched peacefully away from Flemington, N. J., most of them never to return, but all destined to engage in a conflict unparalleled in the annals of war. They fought from Fredericksburg to Appomattox: in more than twenty-four conflicts, such well known battles as Gettysburg, Wilderness, Chancellorsville and Spotsylvania. It was on this battle
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Story of battle of five Forks. (search)
Courthouse. On the same day (31st of March), Warren advanced his corps from the neighborhood of Aren Sheridan and Fitz Lee closed for the night, Warren's corps was on Fitz Lee's flank, and almost ine. Having ascertained the extent of the line, Warren was directed to move around its left flank, beGracie's brigades, moved to his relief, but as Warren had already crossed the White Oak road, the dMill, Anderson made a circuit around Miles and Warren, reached the neighborhood after Fitz Lee and Palmost no infantry and without any cavalry. Warren successful, but relieved. After the very successful operations of this day, in which Warren had played so important and conspicuous a part, andCavalry Headquarters, April 1, 1865. Major-General Warren, commanding Fifth Corps, is relieved frant of promptness in executing his orders, and Warren in his report claims that as far as practicabl The battle of Gettysburg, took his leave, and Warren, in the moment of triumph, was retired from co[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
172. Stuart Gen J. E. B., 65; death of, 69, 216. Sulivane, Colonel, 318. Sumpter, J. U., 183. Swanson, Governor, 164. Swayze, T. F, 164. Talcott, Col. T. M. R., 21. Taliaferro, Major, 17. Taylor Col. W. H., 21, 22. Terrell, Col. J. B. 236. Thompson, Jimmy, 65. Tredegar Battalion, officers of, 200; Works, 6. Trezevant, Major J. T., 16. Venable, Major A. R., 61,65; Col. Charles S., 212. Virginia, Regiment, 3rd, organization of, 185; 14th, organization of, 193. Walker, Gen. R. Lindsay, 125. Warren, General, relieved of command, 174. White, Lt. Col. J. L., 16, Whitehead, Col. A. W., 164,165. Willis, Gen. Edward, 236. Wilson, Henry. 245. Wilson. Gen. James, 18. Wirz, Capt, Henry, 341. Wisdom's Famous Ride, 372. Withers, Col. R. E., 321. Wise, L. W., 361. Winchester, Incidents of battle of, 232. Wood, H. E., 52. Woollen Mills, Crenshaw, 7. Wright, Gen. A. R, 164; Address of, 165. Wright, Major M. H., 16.