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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 54 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Short studies of American authors 33 3 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 30 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 19 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 14 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 8 4 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899. You can also browse the collection for Henry James or search for Henry James in all documents.

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Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 14: men and movements in the sixties (search)
to explain what is evidently inexplicable. Mr. James, however, did not so understand me, but told left the church, Mamma, I should think that Mr. James would wish the little Jameses not to wash thk, laughed quite heartily at it. In anecdote Mr. James was inexhaustible. His temperament was verywithout pain. I once had a long talk with Mr. James on immortality. I had recently lost my youne creature who had been taken from my arms? Mr. James was certain that I should have this coveted in a life after death gave me much comfort. Mr. James occasionally paid me a visit. As he was sitr eight years old, passed by the open door. Mr. James called out, Come here, Maud; You are the wiceen in some time. The little girl came, and Mr. James took her up on his knee. Presently, to my hought to take a childish revenge in accusing Mr. James of ugliness. Although Mr. James held much tMr. James held much to Swedenborg's point of view, he did not belong to the Swedenborgian denomination. I have heard th[1 more...]
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Index (search)
dinner, 26. Dwight, John S., translates Goethe and Schiller, 147; tries to teach Theodore Parker to sing, 162, 163; Henry James reads a paper at the house of, 324; admires Athanase Coquerel's sermon at Newport, 342; Dana's estimate of, 435; his J 286. Eliot, Thomas, attends a lecture by Mrs. Howe in Washington, 309. Elliott, Mrs. (Maud Howe), her remark to Henry James, the elder, 325; goes to Santo Domingo with her parents, 347; takes charge of the woman's literary work at the New Or 121, 193-196. Jackson, Andrew, ridiculed in the Downing Letters, 25; crushes the bank of the United States, 50. James, Henry, the elder, his character and culture, 323, 324; his views on immortality, 325; Swedenborgian tendencies, 326; at Newpor the Howes, 108. King, Charles, editor of the New York American, 22; president of Columbia College, 23. King, James, junior partner of Samuel Ward, 23. King, Rufus, 23. Knowles, James, editor of the Nineteenth Century, 412. Lafayett