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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 24 0 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 21 13 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 18 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 17 1 Browse Search
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves. 9 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 6 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 5 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians. You can also browse the collection for Locke or search for Locke in all documents.

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the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, Introductory Sketch of the early history of Unitarianism in England. (search)
erwent the same frightful sentence. The heretical opinions laid to his charge, as reported by Mr. Locke, See Mr. Locke's Letters to Limborch, Oct. 7, 1699. are evidently such a distortion and exaMr. Locke's Letters to Limborch, Oct. 7, 1699. are evidently such a distortion and exaggeration of Unitarianism as might be expected from violent and prejudiced judges under such circumstances. In 1583, John Lewis was burnt at Norwich for denying the deity of Christ. Some years afteheresy as an Arian So he is called; but the heretical tenets ascribed to him as reported by Mr. Locke, as far as they are intelligible or credible, shew him to have been rather a believer in the sIf there could before have been any rational doubt entertained as to the religious opinions of Mr. Locke, the extracts from his Adversaria Theologica, inserted in the life of this great man by the laogue of Unitarian worthies. The evidence, however, is less direct in his case than in that of Mr. Locke, and may, perhaps, be thought by some to be less decisive; a circumstance which may be account
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, James Peirce (search)
h the newly formed society did not continue more than about six years. During this period, he published the work by which he is chiefly known to posterity as a theologian,—a Paraphrase on some of the Epistles of St. Paul, after the manner of Mr. Locke. He began with the Epistle to the Colossians, which having been received with great favour by the public, was speedily followed by the Epistle to the Philippians. His next attempt was on the Epistle to the Hebrews, which however he did not lis completed by Mr. Hallet, junior, his colleague and successor. These are performances of great ability, and justly maintain a high reputation among biblical scholars. They profess to be a sequel, as far as they go, to the well-known works of Mr. Locke, and are formed for the most part on his plan; but the notes are considerably more elaborate and extended. In point of doctrine, as may be expected, they have a decided leaning in favour of the author's high Arian principles. While he was e
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, George Benson (search)
tion he discharged with great acceptance and satisfaction for eleven years. The admirable success which had attended Mr. Locke's endeavours to apply the principles of just and rational interpretation in his excellent commentary on five of St. Pauon this important work, and commenced with a Paraphrase and Notes on the Epistle to Philemon, attempted in imitation of Mr. Locke's manner; with an Appendix, in which it is shewn, by manifest indications derived from this short epistle, that St. Pau succeeding year by the second Epistle to Timothy; thus completing, when taken in connexion with the previous labours of Locke and Peirce, the entire series of St. Paul's writings. To these were added dissertations on inspiration,—on the abolitionrhaps, too much to say, and it is a high commendation, that it is not unworthy to be ranked as a sequel to the labours of Locke and Peirce. It immediately placed the author's name at a high point in the catalogue of liberal, rational, and learned t
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, John Shute, (search)
lt on the rights of the Dissenters, to a full toleration; and argued the question on those enlarged and general principles which recommended him to the notice of Mr. Locke, with whose friendship, during the short remainder of that great man's life, he continued to be honoured. It is not improbable that to his intercourse with Mr. Mr. Locke we may in part ascribe the diligent attention to theological pursuits, scarcely met with in laymen, for which he afterwards became remarkable, and by the result of which he is now chiefly remembered. It is also reasonable to conclude, that the early disciple of Locke was even at this period not averse to his theological viLocke was even at this period not averse to his theological views; a circumstance which when we consider how well known those views were, and in what light they were regarded by the orthodox—and that Mr. Shute was nevertheless, and continued to be, a man of great influence among the English Presbyterians, may afford us no unplausible ground for the belief that, so early as the very beginning
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, John Taylor, (search)
5 appeared the Paraphrase on the Epistle to the Romans, Among Dr. Taylor's manuscripts, is a paraphrase and practical commentary on the Epistle to the Ephesians. to which is prefixed, A Key to the Apostolic Writings. In this admirable work, the author lays down a principle and mode of interpretation which is better adapted than any other to the right understanding of these (to us) confessedly difficult and obscure compositions. In its main outlines, it seems to have been suggested by Mr. Locke; and is detailed at some length in his note on Romans v. 6-8. In the first place, it is important always to remember that the apostolic writings are chiefly letters, suggested—most of them evidently, and the others in all probability—by the circumstances, and referring to the peculiar wants, conditions, and characters of their correspondents. We are therefore to infer, that, although they doubtless contain indirectly and incidentally an illustration of many important general principles o
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, Caleb Rotheram, D. D. (search)
l disputation, when he took his degree of Doctor in Divinity, in the College at Edinburgh, May 27, 1743. In this dissertation he ably refutes the notion strongly insisted on by many sceptical writers, and somewhat incautiously admitted even by Mr. Locke, that the probability of facts depending on human testimony must gradually lessen in proportion to the distance of the time when they happened, and at last become entirely evanescent. With respect to traditional evidence, properly so called, iat time gave a more than ordinary lustre to this seat of learning: among the rest, Dr. T. Blackwell, Dr. G. Turnbull, Dr. Reid, Messrs. Duncan and David Fordyce, and Mrs. Cockburne, well known as an able defender of the metaphysical principles of Locke and Clarke. On his return from Aberdeen, Mr. Aikin became for a short time an assistant to his former friend and tutor, Dr. Doddridge; agreeably to the practice which that eminent man was accustomed to pursue in the conduct of his academy, by