hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908 14 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908. You can also browse the collection for Theophilus Griffin or search for Theophilus Griffin in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908,
Union Square
and its neighborhood about the year 1846. (search)
man, and a member of the Cincinnati. This residence still remains, and his son, J. Frank Arnold, is still a resident of Somerville. Next to Mr. Arnold's, at the corner of Bow and Milk streets, where Drouet's block now is, was the home of Theophilus Griffin. Mr. Griffin was an owner of sand and brick teams, and one of the most prominent men in that line of business. Mrs. Dr. J. French Smith was his daughter. Returning again to Union square, the estate east of Deacon Vinal's was that of MeMr. Griffin was an owner of sand and brick teams, and one of the most prominent men in that line of business. Mrs. Dr. J. French Smith was his daughter. Returning again to Union square, the estate east of Deacon Vinal's was that of Messrs. Jonathan and Nathaniel T. Stone. Stone avenue now runs through the old Stone estate, and Stone block is on the front of the old Stone property. F. W. Stone, treasurer of the Somerville savings bank, and the Misses Sara and Lucy Stone, Mrs. Jonathan Stone, and Mrs. N. T. Stone, are the present representatives of the Stone families. East of the Stone estate was that of David A. Sanborn, brother of Robert Sanborn, already mentioned, and father of David A., Jr., Daniel A., and Adeline E. Sa
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908, Company E, 39th Massachusetts Infantry, in the Civil War.—(Ii.) (search)
about five miles south of the river, after a hard march of twenty miles. We bivouacked at a spot from which the countless fires of our whole army could be seen, a most impressive sight. This was in The Wilderness. Thursday, May 5. We turned out at 3 p. m. and marched at 6, about two miles, and halted with the enemy's full force in our front. The Battle of the Wilderness was opened by the First and Third Divisions of our corps at 10 a. m. General Warren was in command of the corps, General Griffin of the First Division, and General Crawford of the Third. Colonel Peter Lyle commanded our brigade. They drove the enemy for a while, but were finally forced back. Our division, the Second, together with the Fourth, took their places and repulsed the enemy, who fell back through an opening in the woods and made a stand among the trees, about a quarter of a mile from our line. The whole Thirty-ninth Regiment was in this engagement, Colonel P. Stearns Davis in command, Captain Fred R.
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908, Company E, 39th Massachusetts Infantry, in the Civil War.—(Iii.) (search)
ho was captured by the enemy, William J. Arnold, and John H. Dusseault (originally of this company), who was wounded in the breast, but providentially saved by an army button. His diary says: I was within thirty feet of the enemy's breastworks, and when hit I was sure I was killed, as the force of the blow caused me to spin round and round like a top, and I fell to the ground. Finding I was not seriously hurt, I jumped up and joined in the retreat. We were driven back about a mile, when Griffin's division met us and stopped the retreat. This event happened about 9 o'clock in the morning. General Robinson, commander of our division, lost a leg in this action. When we came back we found Captain W. C. Kinsley, of Company K, in tears. Look at my company! he cried, only seven left out o eighty-seven! But he was assured that the woods were full of our men, and that his would be in shortly. It proved to be so. We were not called on for the rest of the day, and that night the men o
General U. S., 45. 56, 57, 65, 66, 72. Gray, Rev., Francis, 4. Green,———, 73. Green, John, 28. Green, General, Nathaniel, 15. Greene, Colonel J. D., 41. Griffin,———, 57. Griffin, General, 45. Griffin, Theophilus, 8, Grimmons, Charles A., 74. Grissell, or Griswold, Francis, 28, 31. Griswold, Francis, 49. GriswoldGriffin, General, 45. Griffin, Theophilus, 8, Grimmons, Charles A., 74. Grissell, or Griswold, Francis, 28, 31. Griswold, Francis, 49. Griswold, Hannah, 31, 49. Griswold, Joseph, 49, 50. Griswold, Mary, 31. Grocers' Magazine, 3. Guild, Governor, 74. Guiness Station, 60. Hagarstown, Md., 20. Hale, Edward A., 17. Hall, Gustina, 10. Hall, Primus, 15. Hall, Samuel, 30. Hamblen,———, 14. Hamilton, President, 73. Hamilton, Va., 20. Hancock's Corp, 58, 63. Griffin, Theophilus, 8, Grimmons, Charles A., 74. Grissell, or Griswold, Francis, 28, 31. Griswold, Francis, 49. Griswold, Hannah, 31, 49. Griswold, Joseph, 49, 50. Griswold, Mary, 31. Grocers' Magazine, 3. Guild, Governor, 74. Guiness Station, 60. Hagarstown, Md., 20. Hale, Edward A., 17. Hall, Gustina, 10. Hall, Primus, 15. Hall, Samuel, 30. Hamblen,———, 14. Hamilton, President, 73. Hamilton, Va., 20. Hancock's Corp, 58, 63. Hannaford, Edward Francis, 13. Hannaford, Frederick W., 13. Hanover, 61. Harbard, Henry, 31. Harbour, or Harbard, Henry, 31. Harlow, George R., 58. Harper's Ferry, 19. Harris. T. P., 67. Harvard College. 37. Hawes, Frank M., 73, 74, 76. Hawkins, Christopher, 14, 33, 53. Hawkins, Guy C., 14, 15, 33