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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 1,039 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 833 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 656 14 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 580 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 459 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 435 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 355 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 352 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Jefferson Davis or search for Jefferson Davis in all documents.

Your search returned 42 results in 5 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the American army. (search)
of mounted riflemen. In 1855 Congress passed a law authorizing the formation of two new regiments of cavalry, and Mr. Jefferson Davis, then Secretary of War, took advantage of the fact that they had not been designated by the title of dragoons to t of extending the domain of slavery had fired their ardor. Among those most in earnest might already be noticed Colonel Jefferson Davis at the head of a regiment of Mississippi volunteers. Ambitious, impetuous, and eloquent, this old West Pointer uite five thousand men.—Ed.), captured several guns, notwithstanding the efforts of the regular officers, and of Colonel Jefferson Davis, who was seriously wounded at the head of his regiment. This handful of men would have been annihilated but for, who, crossing the field of battle from one side to the other with his battery, saved them from utter destruction. Jefferson Davis never forgot this service, and ever after showed great favor to Bragg, for which he was severely blamed when this of
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—secession. (search)
labama. In confiding the executive power to Mr. Davis, who had been the soul of the rebellion, thetars on its new escutcheon, when it assisted Mr. Davis in this work. It entrusted him with the suporth Carolina to get rid of the despotism of Mr. Davis was treated as treason. If the re-establishplete the dismemberment of the Republic. Jefferson Davis himself continued to take part in the deldacity, had been the soul of secession, Mr. Jefferson Davis, was chosen President. In order to con political acumen and sincere patriotism. Mr. Davis's government was not slow in giving the Fedewhile the Confederate Congress was endorsing Mr. Davis's proclamation announcing the issue of lette means to be used in order to accomplish it. Mr. Davis and his advisers were unable to say whether nd on the 20th of July. On the 27th of May, Mr. Davis removed, with all his government, to the capn whom he was desirous to impose the rule of Mr. Davis. Nevertheless, appreciating the importance [1 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the first conflict. (search)
or that certain victory inspires. The battle was lost to the Federals. Schenck, who had not yet commenced his movement, Davis and Richardson, who had resisted many attempts on the part of the Confederates to cross Bull Run, could do nothing to chacome to bombard Washington. These fears were vain. Beauregard had no idea of threatening the capital of the enemy. Mr. Davis, who had arrived on the field of battle just in time to be present at the victory, had returned to Richmond in order toon in the Southern States. They had protested against a simple insurrection; but success imparted to the government of Mr. Davis, in their estimation, an authority before which they all bowed; if a few secretly preserved their old attachment for thn-plant soon gave place to wheat and corn, more through the natural effect of the law of economy than in consequence of Mr. Davis's ordinances; for the blockade having caused a depreciation in the value of cotton, and increased the price of provisio
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
as altogether neglected. A few creatures of Mr. Davis, occupying important positions, embarrassed e deemed it his duty to defend Lexington, General J. Davis being at Jefferson City with ten thousande did nothing of the kind, but simply ordered J. Davis on the 14th to send two regiments by rail to Lexington. He waited until the 18th to order J. Davis to go to Mulligan's assistance with the greatof reach of the besieged town. The forces of J. Davis, stretching along the line of the Sedalia Rais expected to approach from the west, and Colonel J. Davis with the cavalry of his brigade was to cus. In the capital of the new Confederacy, Mr. Davis and his associates were busy in organizing ae year 1861. As we have stated elsewhere, Mr. Davis had encouraged the equipment of privateers, this. But the battle of Bull Run soon gave Mr. Davis the means of enabling his opponents to form ts with Tatnall, and under the guidance of Captain Davis and Mr. Boutelle she had placed buoys in t[1 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—the first winter. (search)
at Buena Vista by the side of his friend Jefferson Davis. His troops, numbering two thousand fiveccupy the important position of Mill Spring. Mr. Davis, although displeased with him, had not daredwhen likely to be favorable to its measures, Mr. Davis's government, on the one hand, relieved bothought his last division, commanded by Colonel Jefferson Davis, Jefferson C. Davis, now colonel oes of Beauregard, Beauregard announced to Mr. Davis a complete victory, only adding, in conclusise of resisting the Federal authority. When Mr. Davis sought to give them a general organization, ok no notice of those particular interests. Mr. Davis and the central power, pleading the stern nele at every point of the slave territory, Mr. Davis had only been able to get thirty-five thousandents were immediately offered en masse to President Davis. A new law of the Congress authorized hie years at the utmost. On the 8th of August Mr. Davis received similar authority from his own Cong[2 more...]