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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 309 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 157 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 150 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 139 23 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 125 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 100 0 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 96 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 93 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 93 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Leonidas Polk or search for Leonidas Polk in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 3 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the American army. (search)
gn; the volunteers were only their auxiliaries; and even where the latter happened to be more numerous than the former, the regular officers retained, nevertheless, the exclusive control of all operations. Those volunteers did not much resemble the class in the same service who, in 1861, truly represented the nation in arms, for no enthusiasm had stimulated their enlistment. The war which was undertaken against Mexico was iniquitous. The men of the South who then governed the Union, President Polk and his agent Mr. Slidell—the same we have subsequently seen in Europe pleading in behalf of the Confederate cause in the name of the right of nationalities—alarmed at the increasing influence of the free States, had sought to counterbalance it in the councils of the republic by the creation of new slave States. To accomplish this it was deemed necessary to dismember Mexico and to introduce slavery into the territories that would be taken from her. It was for the purpose of carrying out
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
g this controversy, a despatch arrived from General Polk, their superior officer, ordering McCullochw, each with a small division, had been sent by Polk to operate on the right bank of the Mississippir the purpose of preventing the Confederate general Polk from sending reinforcements to Price from Cnineteenth century. This was the Right Reverend Doctor Leonidas Polk, Protestant Episcopal bishop of Louisiana. Educated at West Point, Polk had left the army after serving two years, and had enterf the Federals, which was effected very slowly, Polk immediately sent General Pillow from Columbus wn the woods adjoining the river above Belmont. Polk, on his part, was fully determined not to allowfind nobody to support them. In the mean time, Polk arrives in person on the field of battle with t should respect the neutrality of Kentucky, General Polk took possession of Columbus by surprise. Ttucky no longer existed even in name, and that Polk occupied Columbus, he made his own preparations[1 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—the first winter. (search)
which the Confederate line of defence rested. Polk's army, occupying Columbus, closed the great ri the city of Nashville. His left, commanded by Polk, and subsequently by Beauregard, who guarded Co the garrison of Fort Donelson was a warning to Polk's army not to allow itself to be shut up in Colto form the nucleus. He hastened to reorganize Polk's regiments, which had just left Columbus, and en the first to take up his quarters there with Polk's corps. Braxton Bragg had rejoined him towards of unequal proportions. The first two, under Polk and Bragg, each consisting of two divisions, nuis equals as he was stern to his inferiors; Bishop Polk, who only remembered the early years of hise divided the field of battle among themselves, Polk taking the left, Hardee the centre, and Bragg t, the greater part of which was on that side. Polk and Hardee commanded the centre upon the two rofore the battle.After the battle. First corps, Polk,9,1366,779 Second corps, Bragg,13,5899,961 Th[3 more...]