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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 103 31 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 22 0 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 10 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Clarksburg (West Virginia, United States) or search for Clarksburg (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
y, and his adversaries rendered justice both to his talents and to his humanity towards the vanquished. The greater part of his forces had been brought back to Clarksburg, upon the Baltimore Railroad; and thanks to the reinforcements he had received in the month of August, he had now about ten thousand men at his disposal, forming for a new campaign, and it was expected that they would soon come in collision. The former was quicker than his adversary. About the 3d of September he left Clarksburg with his three brigades and proceeded towards Weston; having reached that place, instead of turning eastward, along the Beverly road, to march against Lee, as tas far as the foot of the Confederates' position. He shut them up once more within the mountainous region, although he had only the three brigades brought from Clarksburg and that of Cox, all together about twelve thousand men. Lee, notwithstanding his numerical superiority, did not deem it proper to disturb him, and confined him