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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—secession. (search)
initiative of insurrection. The militia of Maryland, having assembled spontaneously in spite of Mhich they sent to Richmond; their allies from Maryland had not made their appearance, and they did n finally, the secession movement broke out in Maryland. The sight of the Pennsylvania volunteers hasts, although in a minority in the capital of Maryland, had taken fresh courage, and no longer conceince the capture of Fort Sumter than those of Maryland. The great city of St. Louis, situated near ere still organizing in different counties of Maryland. Virginia, with the exception of the westerncted Richmond from all attack, while menacing Maryland on one side and Washington on the other. Hare Shenandoah Valley, to extend his lines into Maryland and menace Washington or Pennsylvania. In orhe Potomac on the 18th, and to fall back upon Maryland, by way of Williamsport, with about ten thousurgents, who, as we have seen, were arming in Maryland, Virginia, and Kentucky. These troops had th[4 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the first conflict. (search)
e except to the northward, by descending the valley of Cheat River through difficult roads, and striking the frontier of Maryland in order to force his way into the upper gorges of the Alleghanies. Retracing his steps as soon as he was apprised of tillusions in regard to the speedy termination of the war. During this short campaign, Patterson, whom we have left in Maryland in front of the Shenandoah Valley, had resumed the offensive, in pursuance of instructions from Scott, and had thus deta The parallel ridges of the Alleghanies, which extend from south-west to north-east, crossing the whole of Virginia and Maryland, are divided by two deep gaps, through which the waters from the mountains force a passage, forming two rivers, both of his army; but he may be blamed for not having at least detached a few brigades to worry the Federals and harass them in Maryland by crossing the Potomac. We have also seen that this was not his only mistake, and that without some fortunate chances
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
was in the hands of the Federals stationed in Pennsylvania and in Maryland, where they occupied the two slopes of the Alleghanies. The seconat on this side the Federals, being masters of Pennsylvania and of Maryland, occupied the two slopes of the Alleghanies; General Kelley's brig political reasons. Not being able to assist the secessionists of Maryland, it accused them of lukewarmness. While the pickets alone were puhat if the Confederates debouched from the valley of Virginia into Maryland and Pennsylvania, they could not advance so long as he was on theiy serious operation in that part of his line, he brought back into Maryland all the troops which still occupied the right bank of the Potomac. His tolerance, perhaps exaggerated, for the rebel inhabitants of Maryland, was charged against him before the committee, and on a certain da of Urbanna, which served as a depot for the contraband trade with Maryland. In the mean time, the Confederates had armed the Patrick Henry
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—the first winter. (search)
had created, found itself at the beginning of the year 1862 strongly organized for the defence of a territory which comprised nearly all the slave States. The South persuaded herself, as she had persuaded Europe, that all the efforts of her adversaries could not prevail against her resistance. In fact, the North had only been able to wrest from her an insignificant portion of territory compared with the entire extent of her domain. Of the whole slave territory, the North only occupied Maryland, Western Virginia, some parts of Kentucky, the greater portion of Missouri, and certain positions along the coast. But time had enabled her to display her resources, and the war was about to assume new proportions. The volunteers, flocking from all parts, were being organized on the borders of the Potomac, the Ohio, and the Mississippi into large armies. We shall deal first with those which were about to operate west of the Alleghanies. As we have seen, these were divided into three d