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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,126 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 528 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 402 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 296 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 246 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 230 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 214 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 180 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 174 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 170 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) or search for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 4 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the American army. (search)
rily, not more than ten or fifteen, and very rarely twenty, thousand men under their command. These little armies could live upon the country which they occupied. It was not always without difficulty, it is true; and the soldiers of Washington suffered cruelly during the winter they passed at Valley Forge. The English army, passing through a relatively rich country from Philadelphia to New York, was obliged to carry its provisions along with it; and Cornwallis lost all his baggage in North Carolina, even while he was making a conquering march through it. But neither of these had to depend upon that vast system of victualling which relies upon a fixed and certain base of operations, and without which large armies cannot be supported in America. They subsisted, marched, and sojourned for months by the side of an enemy who was master of the country. If we wished to draw a comparison between the two wars, it would be the armies of the North, and not those of the South, that we shou
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—secession. (search)
erent light. The Middle States (Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee) were ready to ab a later period, an attempt on the part of North Carolina to get rid of the despotism of Mr. Davis we borders of the Chesapeake; Fort Macon in North Carolina; Forts Moultrie and Sumter in the bay of Cs Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, as well as North Carolina and Tennessee, which stood aghast, terrifi fell into the hands of the authorities of North Carolina and Florida. A few militia troops of thnd the electoral colleges of Tennessee and North Carolina refused to call a convention at the biddinrebellion. On the 20th the authorities of North Carolina took possession of the Federal mint at ChaConfederacy, while on the same day that of North Carolina voted a levy of thirty thousand volunteersde, and on the 29th, when the secession of North Carolina was imminent and that of Virginia had been advised, refused to sanction that act. North Carolina, who had been one of the last to enter the
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
nited States roads, which, crossing the Alleghanies, connects Kentucky with North Carolina. The culminating point of this road lies upon an eminence easy of defence,acy at Montgomery, was shortly after extended to the coasts of Virginia and North Carolina. This proclamation of the President gave rise to questions of internationa a merchant-vessel who had been wrecked near Cape Hatteras, on the coast of North Carolina. Mr. Campbell, having been kept three months a prisoner in those parts, bro of the Confederates. Between the ocean and the deeply indented coast of North Carolina stretches a narrow tongue of sand, which describes a convex arc and envelopnd in the sounds the means of holding safe communications with all parts of North Carolina. It was defended by a large field-work of octagonal shape, situated on thes became the base of naval and military operations along the whole coast of North Carolina. The capture of these forts, which had not cost the Federals a single man,
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—the first winter. (search)
rely to occupy one of the passes leading into the inland sea of North Carolina, which we have already compared with the lagoons of Venice, but Union in countenance, who were believed to be very numerous in North Carolina, and detach at least a portion of that State from the rebel Con waters. Nothing could be seen from the low and humid beach of North Carolina but the large forests of pine which produce turpentine, whose ttions in a campaign directed against the network of railways in North Carolina. This campaign was in fact undertaken, and Newberne played an euse, he was able to menace the most important railway lines of North Carolina, cutting off, at the same time, all communication with the porte casemated battery and one en barbette. When the government of North Carolina took possession of it at the breaking out of the rebellion, it ot answer the expectations of the Federal government. Not that North Carolina was as ardently devoted to the Confederate cause as her souther