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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 31 results in 4 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—secession. (search)
nsiderable profit, it was soon viewed in a different light. The Middle States (Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee) were ready to abolish it, in imitation of their neighbors of the North, when the suppression of the slave trade gave aendeavoring to win over the powerful border States, such as Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, as well as North Carolina and Tennessee, which stood aghast, terrified at the approach of the crisis brought on by their associates; some, again, were even plend resisted every attempt to drag that State into secession. The legislature of Kentucky and the electoral colleges of Tennessee and North Carolina refused to call a convention at the bidding of the seceders, and the voters of Virginia sent to the intimidated by the threats of the rebels, was voting in favor of secession. On the following day the legislature of Tennessee joined the Confederacy, without waiting for the popular vote on the ordinance of secession, and in spite of the determi
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the first conflict. (search)
ther, had anticipated the declaration of war by many years. So, no doubt, we shall see the still burning embers of that great conflagration lurking in their ashes for a long time to come. But, at the critical moment, the irregular warfare of which those too spacious regions were the theatre exercised no influence upon the great plan of military operations. Finally, the third part, bounded on the west by the Mississippi, and on the north by the Ohio, comprising West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and portions of the neighboring States, was the territory the possession of which the Federals, taking the offensive, disputed with their adversaries. This almost virgin soil was to be trodden by the largest armies that were ever assembled on either side, and witnessed such torrents of human blood as it is the sad privilege of an advanced civilization to shed. In those vast regions, some of the most decisive blows of the war have brought into unexpected notice the name of some humble
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
ime considerable forces were assembling in East Tennessee, and a small army under General Pillow had already passed over from Tennessee to New Madrid, in Missouri, on the other side of the Mississipprom sending reinforcements from Kentucky and Tennessee into Missouri by way of Columbus. The Confenacted between the governors of Kentucky and Tennessee, the former protesting against the invasion commands the road from Cumberland Gap and East Tennessee. This last district is formed of severa In the centre, Zollicoffer only occupied East Tennessee, but was preparing to invade Kentucky by Cted, Zollicoffer was preparing to defend Eastern Tennessee by assuming the offensive, and invading ; and when, on the morning of the 21st, two Tennessee regiments advanced, full of confidence, to a off the communications between Virginia and Tennessee, On the 24th of October its column, after a continue the campaign. The Unionists of Eastern Tennessee, who were waiting for him and had been p[2 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—the first winter. (search)
ions for his nine or ten thousand men from East Tennessee. Fearing lest he should be cut off on thahe brigade of Carter. The volunteers from East Tennessee, who composed this brigade, displayed extrumberland Gap. But to undertake to rescue East Tennessee from Confederate rule, to wrest from them e twelve months volunteers raised by the State of Tennessee. Seeing the number of his opponents incon the Cumberland and protect the capital of Tennessee. Consequently, when Grant had broken at For for the purpose of occupying the capital of Tennessee without delay. But this operation was forbiouri. They were thus able to concentrate in Tennessee all their available forces, the labors of wht events, which were taking place in the State of Tennessee at the same period, and which were destire masters of the largest portion of the State of Tennessee. Having full confidence in the power ofarge number of them, natives of Kentucky and Tennessee, on seeing their homes deserted, left the ra[4 more...]