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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 662 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 188 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 174 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 148 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 142 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) or search for Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 4 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the American army. (search)
icts of Chihuahua, pursued its course by way of El Paso, Santa Fe, and the Rocky Mountains to Fort Leavenworth, on the borders of the Missouri; the other, leaving Monterey, crossed the Rio Grande and Texas, and finally reached the settlements of Arkansas and Louisiana. Although nominally under the jurisdiction of Mexico, this country, of which all adventurers had glimpses in their golden dreams, was in reality the land of God, as the Arabs express it. The first object of the war was to wrest thrisoners by stratagems little creditable to their conquerors. Decimated by sickness, hunger, and, above all, by the fatal abuse of fire-water, the sad remnants of this proud race embarked for New Orleans, and thence proceeded to the prairies of Arkansas, where that civilization which they only knew as an inveterate foe was soon again to find them. This struggle had lasted thirteen years, and although the American army always endeavored to mitigate the evils of that cruel policy of which it w
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—secession. (search)
harmony with modern science, as also with biblical tradition; and that in re-establishing it in a formal manner, the founders of the Constitution at Montgomery had achieved, if we are to believe Mr. Stephens, a revolution fruitful of beneficial results for the future of civilization. In the mean time, the slave States which had not broken up their relations with Washington, oscillated between the two parties, undecided as to what course to pursue. On the 4th of March the convention of Arkansas pronounced against secession; on the 19th that of Missouri adopted, with some reservations, a similar resolution; finally, on the 4th of April that of Virginia rejected by a strong majority the propositions of the seceders. But these States struggled in vain to resist the example of their associates already engaged in the rebellion; linked to their fortunes by that terrible bond of complicity which, in politics as in private life, places every malefactor at the mercy of the most daring, th
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
t. To the southward extended the long frontier of Arkansas, which was exclusively occupied by pro-slavery men bounded on the south and west by the frontiers of Arkansas and Kansas, on the east by the Mississippi, on theoch was organizing a body of Confederate troops in Arkansas, while a brigade of soldiers from that State was fe south-west McCulloch and Pearce had crossed from Arkansas into Missouri; they were ready to sustain Price, aurians, McCulloch's Confederate division, and some Arkansas brigades under Pearce and McBride, had selected Cag in the fields on the right; but two regiments of Arkansas cavalry, who had dismounted, supported by a Louisim. While McCulloch was making his way back into Arkansas, Price was proceeding in a north-westerly directiomiscarry. He aimed at nothing less than to invade Arkansas, and to descend with his army as far as New Orlean first retired to Pineville, only a few miles from Arkansas; but the Missourians having refused to leave their
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—the first winter. (search)
e railway. It passed through Springfield, descended into Arkansas, and after crossing the Ozark Mountains near Bentonville,rsaries, one resting upon St. Louis, the other on the State of Arkansas, had to meet on this road whenever the aim of their c general felt isolated; and since the forces assembled in Arkansas had refused to join him the preceding year, he had becomeh is the ground upon which the first battle that drenched Arkansas with blood was about to be fought. The Southern generarn had taken advantage of Curtis's retreat to abandon Eastern Arkansas. Having turned his back upon his late adversary, he in number by those he had picked up on his march through Arkansas, would have swelled their combined forces to nearly sevenf Van Dorn and that of Buell, were hastening on, one from Arkansas and the other from Nashville, each hoping to arrive firste Mississippi— that of Hindman, composed of soldiers from Arkansas—was striking camp and preparing to leave for home. It ha