Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Gulf of Mexico or search for Gulf of Mexico in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the American army. (search)
ervice. Like those torrents which rush down from the Rocky Mountains in the neighborhood of Santa Fe, some running into the Pacific Ocean and others into the Gulf of Mexico, so did the small band which had started from Fort Leavenworth become divided in the capital of New Mexico; and while Kearny was making his entry into San Frahich the Americans wanted to wrest from their adversary had to be sought, they determined to attack the enemy at the most vulnerable point on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Some troops had been collected at New Orleans for this purpose, but it was deemed necessary to take away from Taylor his best soldiers to form the princiesight by taking advantage of the moment when a portion of his adversaries had already abandoned their positions beyond the Rio Grande and were sailing in the Gulf of Mexico, to attack those that had remained with Taylor before the naval expedition, the object of which a fortunate accident had revealed to him, should call him back
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—secession. (search)
from Mexico some of her most valuable provinces; and they thought of further increasing the number of their States by seizing Cuba and the whole coast of the Gulf of Mexico. They had succeeded, by means of a shrewd policy, in creating for themselves a considerable party in the North, whose support had long given them a preponderhe Golden Circle constituted throughout the South a vast secret society, whose object was to extend the confederacy of slave States in a circle all around the Gulf of Mexico, and to found a great power comprising, besides the cotton States, the greatest portion of Mexico and the Antilles. This devoted and unscrupulous organizatio they had been delivered up was called a treaty of evacuation, and Waite was conveyed, with about twelve hundred of his men, to Indianola, on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, where, although promised permission to ship for any of the Northern ports, he was detained under various pretexts. The capitulation of San Antonio was not l
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the first conflict. (search)
tly into the sea, emptying either into the Atlantic or into the Gulf of Mexico. On the opposite slope, these waters rush from every point of arates the Atlantic slope from that portion of the basin of the Gulf of Mexico which lies east of the Mississippi; it is a fertile country, ve the Mississippi traces from the centre of the continent to the Gulf of Mexico, and the waters of which may mark a geographical division, but into two distinct basins, that of the Atlantic and that of the Gulf of Mexico; the one of peculiar importance, the other comparatively insign three distinct groups in the three basins of the Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Mississippi, with scarcely any connection between thembasin with the other two groups. The States bordering on the Gulf of Mexico, more recently settled and less populated than those of the Easgroups corresponding with the three basins of the Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico and the Ohio respectively. They are only connected by a few li
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
on Davis, fitted out as a privateer in the Gulf of Mexico by private individuals, had put to sea in e swept by terrible tempests; those of the Gulf of Mexico bristled with reefs and rocks. England po, opposite Florida, at the entrance of the Gulf of Mexico. No maritime power had ever yet attemptaging sea and the northern gales sweep the Gulf of Mexico, the blockade was effectually established e, known as the blockading squadron of the Gulf of Mexico, was composed of twenty-one ships, with anr, which empties its muddy waters into the Gulf of Mexico, not only forms a delta like the Nile, thefew weeks after, upon another point in the Gulf of Mexico, at Galveston, in Texas, the Federals by a compels us to take the reader back to the Gulf of Mexico, along whose coast the Federals endeavoredm to blockade one of the best ports in the Gulf of Mexico. But they had left a large arsenal in th Fort Pickens. More to the west, in the Gulf of Mexico, and about the same time, the Federals sei
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—the first winter. (search)
ion. An important line of railway leaves the Mississippi at Memphis, pursuing an easterly direction. It crosses the Tennessee above Muscle Shoals, and consequently cannot be interfered with by large vessels, and it continues in a north-easterly direction as far as Chattanooga. It was the great artery which connected the east of the Confederacy with the west. It was intersected at Corinth by a long line, called the Mobile and Ohio Railway, which extended directly from the north to the Gulf of Mexico, placing the Confederate army in communication with the States adjoining that sea. Pittsburg Landing is only about twenty-six miles from Corinth, and the concentration of the Federals on the right bank of the Tennessee clearly demonstrated to Beauregard that this junction was the point they intended to strike to disorganize the network of his railroads. It was, therefore, on that spot that this network had to be defended. The position occupied by the Federals at Pittsburg Landing was