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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 895 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 706 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 615 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 536 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 465 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 417 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 414 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 393 5 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 376 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 369 33 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Fitzhugh Lee or search for Fitzhugh Lee in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VI:—Virginia. (search)
into the interior in order to protect Richmond, Lee boldly placed himself in the angle formed by thops. Consequently, although his inaction after Lee's retreat in Virginia was entirely to the advanfoundation in fact. Thus, for instance, whilst Lee was only able to oppose forty thousand men at S the valley of Virginia, persisted in attacking Lee in front, between Martinsburg and Winchester, hre then only the interpreters; and, by menacing Lee's communications, he would certainly have compe, comprising the three brigades of Hampton, Fitzhugh Lee and Jones, eighteen hundred strong, accompa 13th he again crossed the Blue Ridge to rejoin Lee, followed at a distance by detachments of Federn for the performance of this service. Nor was Lee's army free from these difficulties; and a Prusrow himself upon his rear; if, on the contrary, Lee proceeded up the valley, he counted upon compelap-were, therefore, either masked or occupied. Lee had not defended them, and had merely directed [10 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
gade, Rhodes, 4 regiments; 2d Brigade, McRae, 4 regiments; 3d Brigade, Ripley, 4 regiments; 4th Brigade, Anderson, 4 regiments; 5th Brigade, Colquitt, 4 regiments. Division of cavalry, Stuart. 1st Brigade, Hampton, 3 regiments; 2d Brigade, Fitzhugh Lee, 3 regiments; 3d Brigade, Jones, 3 regiments. Reserve artillery, Pendleton, 88 pieces. Note D, page 293. It is impossible for us to enter into the details of the discussions to which General Porter's conduct on the 29th of August, 1862eneral attack made at the outset. It will presently be seen that Burnside, having become general-in-chief, did not have the same scruples in hurling his divisions against the formidable position of Marye's Hill. Finally, Mr. Woodbury states that Lee would not have committed the fault of stripping his right in the presence of the whole of the Ninth corps. This assertion is contradicted by the report of the Confederate general himself, who says that he had left the defence of the approaches to
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 9 (search)
s brigade, Lawton's brigade. 4th Division, Taliaferro. Paxton's brigade (formerly Winder's), Jones' brigade, Warren's brigade, Pendleton's brigade (formerly Starke's). Artillery, Walker. Cavalry Division, Stuart. W. F. Lee's brigade, Fitzhugh Lee's brigade, Hampton's brigade. Reserve Artillery, Alexander. Note.—These tables are sometimes incomplete, for they have been prepared from information gathered here and there in the reports of different generals, there being no official ormerly Winder's), Jones' brigade, Warren's brigade, Pendleton's brigade (formerly Starke's). Artillery, Walker. Cavalry Division, Stuart. W. F. Lee's brigade, Fitzhugh Lee's brigade, Hampton's brigade. Reserve Artillery, Alexander. Note.—These tables are sometimes incomplete, for they have been prepared from information gathered here and there in the reports of different generals, there being no official records in relation to the subject, except for Lee's army at Fredericksbu
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Bibliographical note. (search)
3, 2 vols.; A Rebel War-clerk's Diary, by Jones, Philadelphia, 1866, 2 vols.; Memoirs of the Confederate War, by Heros Von Borcke, London, 1866, 2 vols.; Medical Recollections of the Army of the Potomac, by Chief Surgeon Letterman, New York, 1866, 1 vol.; Four Years of Fighting, by Coffin, Boston, 1866, 1 vol.; Partisan Life with Mosby, by Scott, London, 1867, 1 vol.; General Burnside and the Ninth Army Corps, by Woodbury, Providence, 1867, 1 vol.; Three Years in the Sixth Corps, by Stevens, 2d edition, New York, 1870, 1 vol.; General Lee, by Edward Lee-Childe, Paris, 1874, 1 vol.; Narrative of Military Operations, by General J. E. Johnston, New York, 1874, 1 vol. This last-named work, which has just appeared, possesses an especial interest, being written by the principal survivor of the Confederate generals, nine years after the close of the war, with all the care and moderation to be expected from a writer who relates events in which he has himself played the most conspicuous part.