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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 54 results in 6 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
ead of Jackson's column bore the same name as the one he was about to attack, the First Maryland. This unfortunate State of Maryland, convulsed by conflicting passions, inflamed by its neighbors of the North on one side and by those of the South on to a slave State, when found fighting under the Federal flag, were nothing but traitors in their eyes. The Federals of Maryland, on the contrary, regarded their fellow-citizens who had enlisted in the Southern army as twofold rebels: first, agains Jackson, in spite of his desire to invade the Northern States and the ardor which seized him as soon as he drew near to Maryland, was preparing to slip away from his adversaries by a speedy retreat before the latter had time to concentrate a superient he confirmed all the alarms and anxieties into which his opponents had been thrown by his late successes in menacing Maryland and Washington; he magnified the number of his forces in their imagination, thus relieving Richmond, and securing for hi
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
cause. It is true that he did not look upon Maryland as a hostile country. Being a slave State, Sfully aided them in Virginia. Emigrants from Maryland who had taken refuge in the ranks of Lee's areign State whose soil he trod. The people of Maryland took him literally at his word, and did not sed at this reception, naturally accused their Maryland brethren of cowardice and treason. Lee, holy to cross the water in their turn and enter Maryland to avoid being surrounded by the enemy, and jpaign, so as to protect Baltimore and to free Maryland. The plan of the invaders, however, was not ave seen Franklin's heads of column appear on Maryland Heights, driving McLaws' weak forces before only to learn that their comrades had entered Maryland. They could not follow them thither, for theLee so long as the campaign was prosecuted in Maryland. To their number must be added the killed, wndon the last inch of ground they occupied in Maryland; they ceased to menace Pennsylvania; and inst[18 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Kentucky (search)
Book IV:—Kentucky Chapter 1: Perryville. THE defeats of Pope in Virginia, followed by the invasion of Maryland, had reawakened the aggressive ardor of the Confederates in the West. Believing that Baltimore, Washington and Philadelphia were already in the power of Lee, both soldiers and officers in Bragg's army dreamed in their turn of the conquest of Cincinnati and Louisville, the deliverance of Nashville, Memphis, and even of New Orleans. The secessionists, who were numerous inright wing and defeated it, but failed in his efforts against the Federal centre. The retreat of the Confederates, which only ended at Chattanooga, was for them a disappointment all the more bitter, because it coincided with the abandonment of Maryland by Lee, as Bragg's march had coincided with the aggressive campaign of the army of Virginia. The combat at Richmond in Kentucky took place on the same day that the battle of Manassas was fought. On leaving Kentucky the Confederates charged the
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VI:—Virginia. (search)
ky could not compensate for the evacuation of Maryland in the eyes of those who already expected to s illustrious general, and the inhabitants of Maryland were denounced in unmeasured terms for havingomac and the Shenandoah, continuing to menace Maryland with an offensive return. The rich valley ofe contemptuously styled by the inhabitants of Maryland, who had refused to compromise themselves for But still dreading an offensive return into Maryland on the part of his opponent, so long as that this purely defensive attitude. By menacing Maryland, at least apparently, he satisfied public opiended to cover the Upper Potomac, and protect Maryland and Pennsylvania in that direction against thuart soon turned to the right, and re-entered Maryland through Emmettsburg. The movements of Cox, an had nothing more to fear for the safety of Maryland, and he intended to follow the eastern slope bring him. The cantonments of the army in Maryland were considerably scattered. It required sev[2 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VII:—politics. (search)
. The complicity of the latter with the insurgents, especially in Maryland, was not doubted; but as the courts of this State were entirely coous proceedings, however, had not discouraged the secessionists of Maryland. The legislature had been elected under their auspices, and they ainst the servile institution not to have a rebounding effect upon Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri, despite all the provisions of the law whicn a fortnight after Congress had passed the law, slave-owners from Maryland were seen to visit a Federal camp, provided with an order from Gen Southern Confederacy. If applied only to the States of Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Missouri and Tennessee, it would have involve been revived after the great excitement caused by the invasion of Maryland was for a moment suspended, just as the murmurs of a crowd are husority. The proclamation naturally did not extend to the States of Maryland and Delaware, which had never participated in the rebellion; nor t
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Bibliographical note. (search)
Bibliographical note. To the works mentioned at the end of the first volume as having been particularly consulted by the author it is proper to add the following for the second volume: Campaigns in Virginia and Maryland, by Colonel Chesney, London, 1863 and 1865, 2 vols.; War Pictures of the South, by Estvan, London, 1863, 2 vols.; A Rebel War-clerk's Diary, by Jones, Philadelphia, 1866, 2 vols.; Memoirs of the Confederate War, by Heros Von Borcke, London, 1866, 2 vols.; Medical Recollections of the Army of the Potomac, by Chief Surgeon Letterman, New York, 1866, 1 vol.; Four Years of Fighting, by Coffin, Boston, 1866, 1 vol.; Partisan Life with Mosby, by Scott, London, 1867, 1 vol.; General Burnside and the Ninth Army Corps, by Woodbury, Providence, 1867, 1 vol.; Three Years in the Sixth Corps, by Stevens, 2d edition, New York, 1870, 1 vol.; General Lee, by Edward Lee-Childe, Paris, 1874, 1 vol.; Narrative of Military Operations, by General J. E. Johnston, New York, 1874, 1 vo