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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 8 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Africa (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Africa (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Pennsylvania. (search)
to forced marches, had to make up for the absence of cavalry by their own activity. They left Greenwood on the 26th of June in two columns, and reaching Gettysburg in the evening dislodged from it, Gettysburg, crosses the mountains west of Cashtown and descends toward Chambersburg by way of Greenwood and Fayetteville. A glance at the map will show much better than this explanation that the twet, leaving Pickett's division at Chambersburg, made a march with the other two, and halted at Greenwood at the entrance of the mountains. The march of the column, therefore, had been very slow, andinstructions; and, besides, he had no choice as to the route to be followed: he had to come to Greenwood to take his place in the rear of the rest of the army along the turnpike. Ewell bitterly regreach him before the next day. The other two divisions, under McLaws and Hood, had started from Greenwood in the morning, after having successively aided in the passage of Johnson's division, all the