Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Pemberton or search for Pemberton in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—eastern Tennessee. (search)
he rescue of Vicksburg. These troops, as the reader has seen, were lost alike to Bragg and to Pemberton. If Rosecrans in the month of May had vigorously attacked Bragg and pushed him beyond the Tenvernment at Richmond, being obliged to relieve him, would no doubt have paid less attention to Pemberton and concentrated all the available forces to crush the Federal Army of the Cumberland. The dengly or unwillingly, came to recompose under Hardee the old army formerly under the command of Pemberton. However, Johnston, learning on the 7th that Atlanta seemed to be threatened, immediately dirthe loss of Vicksburg. Really, the situation in which Rosecrans is placed resembles that of Pemberton. Beaten as Pemberton was, Rosecrans, like Pemberton, allows himself to be pent up within a naPemberton was, Rosecrans, like Pemberton, allows himself to be pent up within a narrow place. He abandons Lookout Mountain, which covers Chattanooga, as the opponent of Grant had abandoned Haynes' Bluff. We have alluded to that chain of abrupt mountains extending like a long wal
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the siege of Chattanooga. (search)
burg: these are the Fifteenth and the Seventeenth, commanded by his two favorite lieutenants, Sherman and McPherson. The former while returning from Jackson halted on the banks of the Big Black River. The latter encamps within the works which Pemberton had so long defended. In this army, thus divided, every one thinks only of resting, for all have very quickly understood that great operations are suspended. The men would have gallantly made another effort if it had been demanded of them fanks the refusal of the help which the latter asks of him, sends a copy of Halleck's orders. Thanks to Grant, six divisions will leave Memphis in a few days to proceed to the assistance of Rosecrans: it is the flower of the army before which Pemberton has surrendered. Sherman commands these troops, and he will thus double their value. His chief, who regretfully parts with him, is aware of the service which he renders to the Federal cause by opening a new and vast field of activity to the m
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
s year had been marked for the Federals by the conquest of the greater part of the valley of the Arkansas. In fact, whilst Blunt was establishing himself on the upper end of this river, we have yet to relate how Steele, taking more to the east another Union army, reached its banks in the very heart of the State to which it gives its name. We have said that after the capture of Vicksburg, Halleck, in spite of Grant's advice, had resolved to divide the powerful army which had just caused Pemberton to capitulate, and employ its fragments in the minor operations which might not have any great influence on the final issue of the war. We have seen that this army, already much weakened by sickness, furloughs, and the occupation of the most important posts on the banks of the Mississippi, had been deprived of the Ninth corps, which Parke had brought back to Kentucky to follow Burnside on the road to Knoxville, and of the Thirteenth, which Ord had taken to New Orleans to assist Banks in i
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
any one or with the tacit permission of the Federal commanders, to New Orleans, where it was sold at extravagant prices. The owners, almost all officers in the Confederate ranks or guerilla chiefs, were often paid in kind, and received through the same channel provisions, clothing, and even arms and ammunition, which served to maintain and equip the enemy's army. This trade assumed such a development that the Confederate authorities themselves profited so directly by it that one day General Pemberton, before the siege of Vicksburg, dared to complain that a shipment of cotton had been seized in New Orleans which had been shipped to be sold, being consigned under the name of an English subject, a merchant of that city. In order to be better able to combat these abuses, General Banks was not disposed to enforce the regulations enacted in January, 1864, by the Secretary of the Treasury, which, in spite of their restrictions, would have bound his hands. But in spite of the discretiona