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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 150 30 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 49 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 38 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 34 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 34 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 32 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 26 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 25 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) or search for Bolivar, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
On the 24th, Richardson, after having crossed the Hatchie, was continuing his route with one regiment, when he encountered Colonel Prince, who was hurrying from Bolivar to meet him at the head of the Seventh Illinois. After watching each other for a moment, the two forces spring to the charge, but the Federals, being more numeroo the south-west. Leaving the Union cavalry uncertain as to whether it will follow this route or that to Jackson, he marches all night, clears the Hatchie below Bolivar, and will again meet his chief on the 25th. The latter, as soon as he saw the trains on the road, started ahead with his cavalry after being the last to leave e had retired during the night. Richardson, whose force increases at every step, sleeps at Whiteville, so as to come up with the Federals the next morning by the Bolivar road. Forrest will follow the direct Estenaula road to fall on their left flank when the battle has commenced. This plan is faithfully carried out. Prince, alth
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
tracks. He could, as we have said, mount scarcely more than two thousand men. The first engagement took place on the 29th of March between a detachment of Unionists and the Neely brigade at the moment when the latter was establishing itself at Bolivar. It repulsed easily the assailants with a loss of twenty wounded and thirty prisoners. The following day Chalmers rejoined Neely in this town, for, informed of Grierson's movements, Forrest had summoned him on the 27th, directing him to leave o be recruited among the slaves who would take refuge in the Federal lines. In the first week of April, Forrest concluded to forward against Fort Pillow Bell's and McCulloch's brigades, which were in the vicinity of Jackson. Neely remained at Bolivar to cover the southern route. Buford, who occupied Trenton with Thompson's brigade, was authorized to make some demonstrations against the Federal posts in East Kentucky, intended to divert the attention of the enemy from the main operation. A