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George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition., Preface to the first edition (search)
and the errors, sometimes repeated even by considerate writers, whose distrust was not excited, have almost acquired a prescriptive right to a place in the annals of America. This state of things has increased the difficulty of my undertaking, and, I believe, also, its utility; and I cannot regret the labor which has enabled me to present, under a somewhat new aspect, the early love of liberty in Virginia; the causes and nature of its loyalty; its commercial freedom; the colonial policy of Cromwell; the independent spirit of Maryland; the early institutions of Rhode Island; and the stern independence of the New England Puritans. On these and other points, on which I have differed from received accounts, I appeal with confidence to the judgment of those who are critically acquainted with the sources of our early history. I have dwelt at considerable length on this first period, because it contains the germ of our institutions. The maturity of the nation is but a continuation of i
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition., Preface to the first edition (search)
and the errors, sometimes repeated even by considerate writers, whose distrust was not excited, have almost acquired a prescriptive right to a place in the annals of America. This state of things has increased the difficulty of my undertaking, and, I believe, also, its utility; and I cannot regret the labor which has enabled me to present, under a somewhat new aspect, the early love of liberty in Virginia; the causes and nature of its loyalty; its commercial freedom; the colonial policy of Cromwell; the independent spirit of Maryland; the early institutions of Rhode Island; and the stern independence of the New England Puritans. On these and other points, on which I have differed from received accounts, I appeal with confidence to the judgment of those who are critically acquainted with the sources of our early history. I have dwelt at considerable length on this first period, because it contains the germ of our institutions. The maturity of the nation is but a continuation of i
were to be purchased on shipboard, as men buy horses at a fair. Sad State of Virginia, 1657, p. 4, 5. Hammond's Leah and Rachel, 7. In 1672, the average price in the colonies, where five years of service were due, was about ten pounds; while a negro was worth twenty or twenty-five pounds. Blome's Jamaica, 84 and 16. So usual was this manner of dealing in Englishmen, that not the Scots only, who were taken in the field of Dunbar, were sent into involuntary servitude in New England, Cromwell and Cotton, in Hutchinson's Coll. 233—235. but the royalist prisoners of the battle of Worcester; Suffolk County Records, i. 5 and 6. The names of two hundred and seventy are recorded. The lading of the John and Sarah was ironwork, household stuff, and other provisions for planters and Scotch prisoners. Recorded May 14, 1652. and the leaders in the insurrection of Penruddoc, Burton's Diary, IV. 262. 271. 5 Stith, 171. Godwin's Commonwealth, IV. 172. in spite of the remonstrance
i. 156. A naval war soon followed, which Cromwell eager- 1652 ly desired, and Holland as earnef to sweep the English flag from the seas. Cromwell was not disposed to trammel the industry of Vpain, the protector of English shipping, that Cromwell laid claims to glory. The crown passed from of Navigation were the surviving monuments of Cromwell. The protection of English shipping, thus his an accidental and transient arrangement. Cromwell never made any appointments for Virginia; notstill referred the decision of the dispute to Cromwell. The members of the assembly, apprehensive ims. Hening, i. 504, 505. The death of Cromwell made no change in the 1658. constitution of in private, and unanimously resolved that Richard Cromwell should be acknowledged. Hening, i. 511ard, i. 599—602. A remonstrance, addressed to Cromwell, demanded an 1656. unlimited liberty; and wet it was not refused; for, some months before Cromwell's death, 1658. Mar. the Virginians invited t[2 more...]
y. A new assembly, convened at Patux- Oct ent, acknowledged the authority of Cromwell; but it also exasperated the whole Romish party by their wanton disfranchisemed to popery, prelacy, Bacon, 1654, c. IV or licentiousness of opinion. Yet Cromwell, a friend to religious toleration, and willing that the different sects, like omed to Maryland. He was kept a prisoner during part of the administration of Cromwell; On this occasion were published Strong's Babylon's Fall in Maryland, and Leterminate will. Barber, in Langford, 15. And yet the same causes which led Cromwell to neglect the internal concerns of Virginia, compelled him to pay but little during his government were thought worthy of being perpetuated. The death of Cromwell left the condition of England uncertain, and might well diffuse a gloom througbe done? England was in a less settled condition than ever. Would the son of Cromwell permanently hold the place of his father? Would Charles II. be restored? Di
ard, i. 122 It has been said that Hampden and Cromwell were on board this fleet. Bates and Dugdal no circumstances in the lives of Hampden and Cromwell corroborating the story, but many to establisWinthrop, i. 266, is decisive Had Hampden and Cromwell been of the party, they too would have reacheon, i. App. VIII. After the successes of Cromwell in Ireland, he 1651. voluntarily expressed hich the inhabitants enjoyed the confidence of Cromwell throughout all the period of his success. Thule his spirit, rather than to storm cities. Cromwell, in return, was moved by the sincerity of theThe people of New England were ever sure that Cromwell would listen to their requests, and would takst, will fight best; such was the judgment of Cromwell, the greatest soldier of his age. It was irtunes. Massachusetts never acknowledged Richard Cromwell; it read clearly in the aspect of partiesolonies? Would it imitate the magnanimity of Cromwell, and suffer the staple of the south still to [1 more...]