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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 98 14 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 86 10 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 32 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 17 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 8 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 25, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition.. You can also browse the collection for William Berkeley or search for William Berkeley in all documents.

Your search returned 56 results in 5 document sections:

d far stronger claims for favor than Rhode Island and Con- 1661. April 30. necticut; and Sir William Berkeley himself embarked for England as the agent of the colony. But Virginia was unhappy alike in the agent whom she selected and in the object of her pursuit. Berkeley was eager in the advancement of his own interests; and Virginia Chap XI.} desired relief from the pressure of the navigation act, Albany Records, XVIII. 158. In reply, the Dutch W. I. C., July 15, 1662. Gov. Berkeley has as yet effected very little in favor of the English Virginians. Records, XVIII. 197 which Charleration, as recklessly as a man would 1673 give away a life-estate in a farm. Meantime Sir William Berkeley made use of his presence in England for his own account, and set the example of narrowing 1663 other principal courtiers and statesmen of that day, in an immense speculation in lands. Berkeley, being about to return to America, was perhaps esteemed a convenient instrument. King Charles
rother, Morryson, in Burk, III. 266. Sir William Berkeley, the governor of Virginia; and the pass fulfilled. Williamson's N. C. i. 84, 85. Berkeley, ibid. 255. Martin, i. 94, 125. Chalmers, 5proprietaries, in their instructions to Sir William Berkeley, we hope to find more facile people tha and banished from Virginia in 1648, by Sir William Berkeley. Were the exile and the colonist in an year, George Cathmaid could claim from Sir William Berkeley a large grant of land upon the Sound, aacted the attention of the proprietaries, and Berkeley was commissioned to institute a government ovncluded in the first patent of Carolina. Yet Berkeley, who was but governor of Virginia, and was a nds from the aboriginal lords of the soil. Berkeley did not venture to discuss the political prinening, i. 549, II. 158. from Scotland, Sir Wm. Berkeley's List, &c., copied by Greenhow, publishebued with the passion for popular liberty, Berkeley, as above. And a Narrative of the Indian and
rtunate in the selection of its agent. Sir William Berkeley did not, even after years of experience whole annual expenditure of Connecticut; but Berkeley was dissatisfied. A thousand pounds a year w in the desert could give their offspring. Berkeley, in Chalmers The paths were bridleways rather to march against the In- April. dians, when Berkeley, yielding to the instigations of an aristocraon, and rescue the colony from the tyranny of Berkeley. The call was answered; none were Aug. 3. we, Bacon proceeded against the Indians, while Berkeley withdrew beyond the Chesapeake, and, by promin the early history of Virginia, advised that Berkeley should be deposed, and Sir Henry Chichely subd, had already expired. Bonds, &c. p. 107. Berkeley, in Chalmers, calls his government a settlemelows. When Cheesman was arraigned for trial, Berkeley demanded, Why did you engage in Bacon's desigublic proclamation he censured the conduct of Berkeley, as contrary to his commands and derogatory t[27 more...]
, should there be strife between old friends and neighbors, brothers in Christ, dwelling in countries so far from Europe? Commerce, if interrupted by a transient hesitancy as to its security, soon recovered its freedom, and was sometimes conducted even with Europe by way of Virginia. Equal rights 1659 in the colonial courts were reciprocally secured by Chap. XV.} 1664. June 10. treaty. But upon the restoration, the act of navigation, at first evaded, was soon enforced; and by degrees, Berkeley, whose brother coveted the soil of New Jersey, threatened hostility. Clouds gathered in the south. Albany Records, IV. 133, 165, 168, 198, 211, 236, 248, 282, 351, 320, 382; XXIV. 101, &c., 300, 399, 401; XVIII. 157, &c., 197, 258—262. In the north, affairs were still more lowering. Massachusetts did not relinquish its right to an indefinite extension of its territory to the west; and the people of Connecticut not only increased their pretensions on Long Island, but regardless of t
ple killed all day long. Is it strange that they looked beyond the Atlantic 1674 for a refuge? When New Netherlands was recovered from the United Provinces, Berkeley and Carteret entered again into possession of their province. For Berkeley, already a very old man, the visions of colonial fortune had not been realized; thereBerkeley, already a very old man, the visions of colonial fortune had not been realized; there was nothing before him but contests for quitrents with settlers resolved on governing themselves; and in March, 1674, a few 1674 Mar. 18. months after the return of George Fox from his pilgrimage to all our colonies from Carolina to Rhode Island, the haughty peer, for a thousand pounds, sold the moiety of New Jersey to Quakers, wn his people with dominion. Fox and Burnyeat, in Hazard's Reg. VI. 184—200. In the midst of this innocent tranquillity, Byllinge, the original grantee of Berkeley, claimed as proprietary the right of nominating the deputy-governor. The usurpation was resisted. Byllinge grew importunate; and the Quakers, setting a new pre