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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 104 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Shaftesbury or search for Shaftesbury in all documents.

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1683. before an English tribunal, under judges holding their office at the pleasure of the crown; and Randolph, the hated messenger, arrived with the writ. At the Oct. same time, a declaration from the king asked once more for submission, promising as a reward the royal favor, and the fewest alterations in the charter consistent with the support of a royal government. The people of Massachusetts had been close observers of events in England. They had seen a popular party, of which Shaftesbury assumed the guidance, and of which the house of commons was the scene of victories, rise, act, and become defeated. They had seen Charles II. gradually establish despotic power. They had seen the people of England apparently acquiescing in the subjection of parliament. An insurrection had indeed been planned; the doctrine had indeed been whispered, that resistance to oppression was lawful. But the doctrine had been expiated by the blood of Sidney and of Russell; and the colonists kne
mia; Lord Ashley Cooper, afterwards earl of Shaftesbury; Sir John Colleton, a royalist of no histor purposes rarely. The party connections of Shaftesbury were affected by the revolutions of the tim to the gentry as well as to the democracy, Shaftesbury immediately joined the party opposed to the Evelyn, II. 361, asserts positively that Shaftesbury did not advise the king to invade the excheThis contempt for humanity punishes itself; Shaftesbury was destitute of the healthy judgment which reject astrology. Excellent in counsel, Shaftesbury was poor as an executive agent. His restlelome, in 1672. Empires, added an admirer of Shaftesbury, will be ambitious of subjection to the nob Chap. XIII.} 1669. scheme which Locke and Shaftesbury were maturing, framed a few laws, which, hoons. But when he was brought up for trial, Shaftesbury, who at 1680 June that time was in the zenuge where they were assured of favor. Even Shaftesbury, when he was committed to 1681. July. the [24 more...]
d, and the principalities and free cities of Germany, he yet sought the source of wisdom in his own soul. Humane by nature and by suffering; familiar with the royal family; intimate with Sunderland and Sydney; acquainted with Russel, Halifax, Shaftesbury, and Buckingham; as a member of the Royal Society, the peer of Newton and the great scholars of his age,—he valued the promptings of a free mind more than the Chap XVI.} awards of the learned, and reverenced the single-minded sincerity of thngman's cord and the axe; in an age when Sydney nourished the pride of patriotism rather than the sentiment of philanthropy, when Russel stood for the liberties of his order, and not for new enfranchisements, when Harrington, and Chap. XVI.} Shaftesbury, and Locke, thought government should rest on property,—Penn did not despair of humanity, and, though all history and experience See Hume's account of the meeting of the Long Parliament. denied the sovereignty of the people, dared to cheris
English industry unparalleled energies, and Shaftesbury, the skeptic chancellor, was eulogized as till for the ease of Protestant dissenters. Shaftesbury 1673 fell. Under the Lord Treasurer Dangave his influence to the Popish plot. But Shaftesbury was already sure of the merchants and disseforce of public opinion, and of parliament, Shaftesbury, whom, for his mobility and his diminutive e by the commons. It is the distinction of Shaftesbury, that he was the first statesman to attain the commons were prorogued and dissolved. Shaftesbury was displaced, and henceforward the councion institution was made to do service, when Shaftesbury, proceeding 1680 June 16. to Westminster, sclosure and defeat, the voluntary exile of Shaftesbury excited no plebeian regret. No deep popula aristocracy; to Baxter hardly less than to Shaftesbury. It is the consummation of the collision wrished among its numbers men so opposite as Shaftesbury and Sidney, as Locke and Baxter. These t[5 more...]