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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 138 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 102 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 101 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 30 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 24 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 24 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 21 3 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) or search for Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 51 results in 7 document sections:

rocity of justice. To the proprietaries of Carolina the respect of the 1689 revolution for vesteed that one of the proprietaries should visit Carolina, with ample powers 1694 alike of inquiry andtration, rather than into the constitution of Carolina. Not 1695. rejecting the best men of the paists. This was the first Chap. XIX.} act in Carolina disfranchising religious opinion. Soon aftwas, with the laws resting on it, rejected in Carolina. The journals of the provincial assembly shon behalf 1706 March 12. of the dissenters of Carolina, was adopted; the lords of trade and plantatis culture steadily increased; and the rice of Carolina was esteemed the best in the world. Hence the said, with but slight exaggeration, that in Carolina, every one did what was right in Bland, Ms. Chap. XIX.} fomenters of the distractions in Carolina, but the governor of the Old Dominion complaiy to instructions. All the colonies north of Carolina were directed to furnish quotas for the defen[1 more...]
and legitimacy, on the other. Hence, also, in the first war of King William, the frontiers of Carolina, bordering on the possessions of Spain, were safe against invasion: Spain and England were alli sigh for the cool breezes of Hudson's Bay. Yet there were gleams of light: the white men from Carolina, allies of the Chickasas, invaded the neighboring tribes of Indians, making it easy for the Frelation of their trade and cash, issued bills of credit to the amount of six thousand pounds. To Carolina, the Ramsay, i. 129 first fruits of war were debt and paper money. This ill success diminisvictory over its allies. The Creeks, that dwelt between Appalache and Mobile, being friends to Carolina, interrupted the communication with the French. The English flag having been carried triumphans and lakes, at the back of all your majes- 1710. ty's plantations on this continent as far as Carolina; and in this large tract of country live several nations of Indians who are vastly numerous. A
ss. families, with the consent of the government of Pennsylvania, removed from Carolina, and planted themselves on the Susquehannah. Sad were the fruits of that hospave as their Mohawk brothers. IV. South of the Tuscaroras, the midlands of Carolina sheltered the Catawbas. Its villages included the Woccons and the nation spokf the Tennessee River, as far west as Muscle Shoals, and the highlands of Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama— the most picturesque and most salubrious region east of their numbers soon promised to increase; and, being placed between the English of Carolina, the French of Louisiana, the Spaniards of Florida,— bordering on the Choctas,alley of the Cumberland River, to find a vacant wilderness in the highlands of Carolina; and a part of them for years roved to and fro in wildernesses west of the Chm ten thousand; and their warriors strolled as conquerors from Hudson's Bay to Carolina,—from the Kennebec to the Tennessee. Very great uncertainty must, indeed, att<
at the encroachments of the proprietaries of Carolina, who had assigned their lands to unhappy Germint was made of the conduct of the English in Carolina, and especially of the severity of Lawson. Hst bank of the Savannah River. The tribes of Carolina had been regarded Hawks' Mss. i. 29, 30. as and were pursued beyond the present limits of Carolina. The Yamassees retired into Florida, and at sees was followed by a domestic revolution in Carolina. Its soil had been defended by its own peoplum to be beat in the town. But the people of Carolina had, by the power of public opinion, renouncelandgraves, and caciques, were dismissed from Carolina, where they had become so little connected wieserves them from oblivion. The agent from Carolina obtained in England a 1720 ready hearing froion, to convert the Indians on the borders of Carolina into allies or subjects; and, early in 1730,skia, none existed. The English traders from Carolina were; moreover, welcomed to their villages. [7 more...]
Maryland and Virginia, all the indigo and lice of Carolina, were the fruit of his toils. Instead of remainin12. Dalcho. 94, &c. bondage? From New England to Carolina, the notion prevailed, that being baptized is incoe of Lord Cardross, to plant a new colony south of Carolina, in the region that was heralded as the most deligh anticipations, the suggestion was revived. When Carolina became, by purchase, a royal 1728 province, Johnseir accounts; nor yet because the boundary between Carolina and Florida was still in dispute;— these differencGulf of Mexico, and summoned the colonies north of Carolina to contribute four battalions to the armament. No hundred regular troops, four hundred militia from Carolina, beside Indian auxiliaries, who were soon reduced e Leonidas and his Spartans, if we can but protect Carolina and the rest of the Americans from desolation. Antation of rum was no longer forbidden; slaves from Carolina were hired by the planter, first for a short perio
391. Mather, Cotton, III. 71. Champion of witchcraft, 76. Wonders of the invisible world, 95, 98. Mather, Increase, II. 434; III. 71, 83, 89, 375. Mayhew, II. 97. Melendez, I. 66. Mermet, Father, III. 198. Mesnard, Father Rene, III. 144. Lost among the Chippewas, 147. Miamis, III. 240. Miantonomoh, I. 361, 423, 424. Michigan visited by Jesuits, III. 128, 152, 155. French in, 194. Micmacs, III. 237. Milborne, III. 52. Executed, 54. Miller, governor of Carolina, II. 156. Miruelo Diego, I. 34. Mississippi company, III. 350, 354. Mississippi River discovered, I. 51; III. 157. Mississippi State, Soto in, I. 51. French settlement, III. 201, 349. Events in, 366. Missouri visited by De Soto I. 52. The French, III. 159. Mobile, Soto at, I. 48. Settled, III. 205, 206. Mobilian language, III. 249. Mohawks, II. 417. Mohegans, I. 423. Monk, Duke of Albemarle, II. 28. Montreal, I. 21: III. 127, 179. Moravians, III. 423.
ny of, first settled, I. 379. Its charter, 425. Fostered by Charles II., II. 61. New charter, 62. Freedom of conscience in, 65. Loses its liberty, 431. Its population, II. 69. Ribault discovers River St. John, I. 61. Leaves a colony in Carolina, 62. Revisits it, 66. Rice introduced into Carolina, II. 20. Roberval's voyages, I. 22. Robinson, John, I. 306. His death, 321. Rolfe, Thomas, I. 146. Rowlandson, Mary, III. 106. Russia makes discoveries, III. 453. Rut's v25. Fostered by Charles II., II. 61. New charter, 62. Freedom of conscience in, 65. Loses its liberty, 431. Its population, II. 69. Ribault discovers River St. John, I. 61. Leaves a colony in Carolina, 62. Revisits it, 66. Rice introduced into Carolina, II. 20. Roberval's voyages, I. 22. Robinson, John, I. 306. His death, 321. Rolfe, Thomas, I. 146. Rowlandson, Mary, III. 106. Russia makes discoveries, III. 453. Rut's voyage, I. 76. Ryswick, peace of, III. 192.