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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 35 11 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Jeffery Amherst or search for Jeffery Amherst in all documents.

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d to Fox. The Grenville Papers show that it was not. The name of Shelburne will occur so often in American history during the next twenty years, that I was unwilling to pass over the aspersions of Walpole. It is to be remembered also, that both whig and tory were very bitter against Shelburne; some of the Rockingham whigs most of all, particularly C. J. Fox and Edmund Burke. of 1763, as became a humane and liberal man; in other respects he was an admirer of CHAP. VI.} 1763. May. Pitt. While his report was waited for, Grenville, through Charles Jenkinson, C. Jenkinson to Sir Jeffery Amherst, 11 May, 1763. Treasury Letter Book, XXII. 392. began his system of saving, by an order to the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in America, now that the peace was made, to withdraw the allowance for victualling the regiments Weyman's New-York Gazette, 3 October, 1763. No. 251, 2, 1. stationed in the cultivated parts of America. This expense was to be met in future by the colonies.
n, commanding officer at the Detroit to Sir Jeffery Amherst, Detroit, 20 April, 1763. They say we ms, and end in their destruction. Letter of Amherst to Major Gladwin, May, 1763. But Pontiac,tawas, and elected their chief; Gladwin to Amherst, 14 May, 1763. respected, and in a manner adoLieut. Governor Hamilton of Pennsylvania to Gen. Amherst, 7 July, 1763. Amherst to Hamilton in reply, 9 July, 1763. Hamilton to Amherst, 11 July. Amherst to Hamilton, 16 July. Lieut. Colonel Roberependence on them, &c. &c. Compare Bouquet to Amherst, 11 August, 1763: Had the Provinces assisted rvation of his post. Col. Bouquet to Sir Jeffery Amherst, 11 August, 1763. The garrison consistearrison was surprised Major Gladwin, to Sir J. Amherst, Detroit, 18 August, 1763. by the appearant disaster could reach New-York, the anger of Amherst against the bloody villains knew no bounds; from me a reward of one hundred pounds; Sir J. Amherst to Major Gladwin, 10 August, 1763: You wil[8 more...]
arliament irritated John Huske's Letter, printed in Boston Gazette of 4 Nov. 1764. the minister. It was an impeachment of his declared belief and of his acts, and his conscience easily condemned opinions which thwarted his ambition. Besides; as a thorough whig, he regarded the parliament of England as chap. IX.} 1764. Mar. in all cases supreme; he knew no other law, no other rule. George Grenville, in Cavendish i. 496. The later reports of the military commanders Letters of Amherst and his subordinates. in America, accused the colonies of reluctance to furnish the men and money which the commanderin-chief had required. Calvert to Lieutenant-Governor Sharpe, February 29 to April 3. The free exercise of deli berative powers by the colonial assemblies, seemed to show a tendency for self-direction and legislative independence, which might even reach the Acts of Navigation. Forged letters of Montcalm, too, were exhibited to Grenville, That these letters, of which I
7 Nov. 1764. And it is affirmed, that to members of the legislature of Massachusetts, from whom he had ends to gain, Hutchinson denied utterly the right of parliament to tax America. Novanglus, printed in 1774-5. The appeals of the Colonies were made in the spirit of loyalty. The wilderness was still ringing with the war-whoop of the savage; M. de St. Ange to M. d'abadie, 15 July, 1764. and the frontiers were red with blood; while the colonies themselves, at the solicitations of Amherst and of Gage, his successor, were lavishing their treasure to secure the west to Great Britain. In July, the little army of eleven hundred men, composed chiefly of provincial battalions from New Jersey, New-York, and Connecticut, that of Connecticut led by Colonel Israel Putnam, The uncommonly meritorious work of Parkman on the Pontiac war, adopts too easily the cavils of the British officers at Bradstreet and at the American battalions. Bradstreet was an excellent officer, and the tro
n the people. But Colden, chap. XVII.} 1765. Sept. emboldened by the arrival of two artillery companies from England, put the fort in such a state of offence and defence, as to be able to boast alike to Conway Colden to Conway, 23 Sept. and Amherst, Colden to Amherst, 10 Oct. that he had effectually discouraged sedition. The people here will soon come to better temper, after taxes become more familiar to them, wrote an officer King's Lib. Ms. 213. The author seems to have been LordAmherst, 10 Oct. that he had effectually discouraged sedition. The people here will soon come to better temper, after taxes become more familiar to them, wrote an officer King's Lib. Ms. 213. The author seems to have been Lord Adam Gordon. who had been sent to America, on a tour of observation. I will cram the stamps down their throats with the end of my sword, James to Colden, giving an account of his examination before Parliament. Letter from N. Y. in S. C. Gazette. cried the braggart James, major of artillery, as he busied himself with bringing into the fort more field-pieces, as well as powder, shot, and shells. A. Golden to C. Golden, Sept. 1765. If they attempt to rise, I, he gave out, will drive them