hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 124 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 92 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 72 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 44 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 35 1 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 32 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. You can also browse the collection for James Otis or search for James Otis in all documents.

Your search returned 46 results in 10 document sections:

ted without curtailment; and amounted to more than seven hundred thousand dollars. The appropriation was chap. V.} 1763. Mar. the most formal recognition that even in the last year of the war, when it was carried on beyond their abounds, the colonies had contributed to the common cause, more than their just proportion. The peace, too, the favorite measure of the ministry and the king, Bernard to Egremont, 16 Feb. 1763. had been gratefully welcomed in the New World. We in America, said Otis Hutchinson's History of Massachusetts, III. 101, 102. to the people of Boston, on being chosen moderator at their first town meeting in 1763, have abundant reason to rejoice. The heathen are driven out and the Canadians conquered. The British dominion now extends from sea to sea, and from the great rivers to the ends of the earth. Liberty and knowledge, civil and religious, will be co-extended, improved and preserved to the latest posterity. No constitution of government has appeared i
1764. Then Mr. Francis Toovey made oath to the truth of the above, before Benjamin Pickman, J. Peace. Boston Gazette, 12 June, 1769. No. 741, 3, 2. Same in the London Daily Advertiser and Morning Chronicle of July 22, 1769, and in Boston Gazette of 9 Oct., 1796, 757. 2. 1. Compare what Lieut.-Governor Sharpe, of Maryland, and Temple, the Surveyor-General of the Customs say of Bernard's integrity in revenue affairs. had invalidated; and this brought him in conflict with the spirit which Otis had aroused in Boston, and which equally pre- chap. IX.} 1763. Oct. vailed among the descendants of the Dutch of New-York. The island of Manhattan lay convenient to the sea, sheltered by other islands from the ocean; having safe anchorage in deep water for many miles along its shores, inviting the commerce of continents, of the near tropical islands, and of the world. To-day its ships, fleet, safe, and beautiful in their forms, exceed in amount of tonnage nearly twice over all the commerci
orner-stone of its policy. In pursuance of them, James Otis prepared a state of the case. Substance of a mles of justice. Ibid., 80. Such were the views of Otis, sent by Massachusetts to its agent in London, to bel is declared to have Mauduit. At the same time, Otis, Cushing, Thacher, Gray, and Sheafe, as the committed recommended. In the Rights of the Colonists, by Otis, the Instructions of the town of Boston are printed; and been drawn up by Otis, and to have been presented to the House in pursuance of the above instructions. lthily laid before the cabinet his views on America, Otis spoke July. through the press to the world of mankier the species. Thus, in the agony of his heart, Otis reasoned for his country and for the race, bringing ree; He builded better than he knew. The book of Otis was reprinted in England. Lord Mansfield, who had r that he overturned the government of Naples. But Otis was a prophet, not the leader of a party; full of sa
ections to the stamp tax, Soame Jenyns, the oldest member of the Board of Trade, published authoritatively the views of his patrons. He mocked at the absurdity of Otis, and the insolence of New-York and Massachusetts. The arguments of America, said he, mixed up with patriotic words, such as liberty, property, and Englis 494. Not one imagined the colonies would think of disputing the matter with parliament at the point of the sword. It is our duty to submit, had been the words of Otis. Otis's Rights of the Colonies, 40. We yield obedience to the act granting duties, Answer of the Council and House, 3 Nov. 1764. had been uttered solemnly byOtis's Rights of the Colonies, 40. We yield obedience to the act granting duties, Answer of the Council and House, 3 Nov. 1764. had been uttered solemnly by the legislature of Massachusetts. If parliament, in their superior wisdom, shall pass the act, we must submit, wrote Fitch, the governor Governor Thomas Fitch to Richard Jackson. Norwalk, 23 Feb. 1765. of Connecticut, elected by the people, to Jackson. It can be of no purpose to claim a right of exemption, thought Hutchinson
iving way for a time to listless agony. Tears, said Otis, relieve me a moment; and repelling the imputation, ay. thought of making a question of jurisdiction. Otis: Vindication, 26. No person appeared to wish fors on the one side censured the fatal acquiescence of Otis, J. Adams: Novanglus, 238. as a surrender of theirt has bled yearly, and is now ready to burst? James Otis: To the Freeholders and other inhabitants of Bosthe house made no reply; but on the sixth of June, James Otis, Diary of Ezra Stiles. Tenth Toast at Libertythat Mrs. Warren, of Plymouth, who was the sister of Otis, told him the proposal was planned at her house, on the return of Otis from a visit to Barnstable. The impulse was given in Boston Instructions of 1764. of Bostoves of Massachusetts shared the creative instinct of Otis. Avoiding every expression of a final judgment, andrepresentation to implore relief. They also elected Otis and two others of their own members to repair to New
s; you are parasites; or, rather, you are parricides. Boston Gaz. Otis's Considerations. N. Y. Gaz. Hutchinson's Correspondence. Powerrdy, whether George or Louis is the sovereign, if both are alike? Otis, and many others. The beast of burden, continued others, asks not whgham, and Sheffield, like America, return no members. Why, rejoined Otis, and his answer won immediate applause in England, Monthly Reviewued, should have his vote. Ah, but, replied the royalists, holding Otis to his repeated concessions, you own that par- chap. XIV.} 1765. Jfor America, unless union could be perfected. Union was the hope of Otis—union that should knit and work into the very blood and bones of thetributed to the great result, we are to name the inspired madman, James Otis; and the magnanimous, unwavering lover of his country, Christophentry, Christopher Gadsden. Otis now seemed to himself to hear the prophetic song of the Sibyls, chanting the spring-time of a new empire.
gladdened during their session by the arrival of the express messenger from Georgia sent near a thousand miles by land to obtain a copy of their proceedings. James Otis to Henry Shelburne, Ms. The members of this first Union of the American people were elected by the representatives of the people of each separate colony. Wive American liberties. Should they build on charters, or natural justice; on precedents and fact, or abstract truth; on special privileges, or universal season? Otis was instructed by Boston to support not only the liberty of the colonies, but also chartered rights. Johnson, of Connecticut, submitted a paper, which pleaded chats and setting forth the liberty which America ought to enjoy, led the Assembly to debate for two weeks on liberty, privileges, and prerogative. In these debates, Otis, of Boston, himself the father of the Congress, displayed great knowledge of the interests of America, and assisted to kindle the fires which afterwards lighted th
In addition to this state paper, which was the imprint; of the mind of Samuel Adams, Not of Otis. The paper has not the style of Otis, and does not express his opinions. Besides; he was absentOtis, and does not express his opinions. Besides; he was absent from Boston from the delivery of Bernard's speech till after the reply was made, performing his duty at New-York, as a member of Congress. The paper has the style of S. Adams, and expresses his sentt the time the applause which it won, said also, that of all the politicians of Boston, including Otis and Cushing, Samuel Adams had the most thorough understanding of liberty and her resources in thece of the people of Boston beyond what was given to any of his colleagues; and the vacillation of Otis, increasing with his infirmities, ceased to be of public importance. Massachusetts never again d affection, with apprehension and firmness of resolve. Pray for the peace of our Jerusalem, said Otis, from his heart, fearing the parliament would charge the colonies with presenting petitions in on
onies were proceeding with their system of resistance. If they do not repeal the Stamp Act, said Otis, who, nine months before had counselled submission, and who now shared and led the most excited o the instance of a committee of which Samuel Adams was the chief, had joined him with Gridley and Otis, to sustain their memorial to the Governor and Council for opening the courts; and he resolved t, therefore, it ought to be waived by the judges as against natural equity and the constitution. Otis reasoned with great learning and zeal on the duties and obligations of judges. Gridley dwelt on nts of law. On Saturday, the town voted the answer unsatisfactory. Ever fertile in resources, Otis instantly proposed to invite the governor to call a convention of the members of both houses of tischarged from our allegiance. The ligaments of government are dissolved, the throne abdicated. Otis, quoting Grotius and the English lawyers, of 1688, assured the public, that If a king lets the af
nty of Providence; and it was resolved to oppose the Stamp Act, even if it should tend to the destruction of the union of America with Great Britain. At Boston, Otis declared, that the original equality of the species was not a mere chimera. Otis in Boston Gazette. Joseph Warren, a young man whom nature had adorned with gracOtis in Boston Gazette. Joseph Warren, a young man whom nature had adorned with grace, and manly beauty, and a courage that would have been rash audacity had it not been tempered by self-control, saw clearly that the more equal division of property among the people, tended also to equalize and diffuse their influence and authority; and he uttered the new war-cry of the world—freedom AND chap. XXIV.} 1766. Mar. their opposition to any act of oppression. The consequences of enforcing the Stamp Act, he was convinced would have been more direful than usually apprehended. Otis, at a meeting at the Town Hall in Boston, to fix a time for the rejoicings, told the people that the distinction between inland taxes and port duties was without f