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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,286 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 656 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 566 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 416 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 360 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 298 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 272 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition.. You can also browse the collection for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) or search for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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. Plowden's Historical Review, i. .276. Compare, too, Dean Swift's Letters. and every successive period of discontent swelled the tide of emigrants. Just after the peace of Paris, the Heart of Oak Protestants of Ulster, weary of strife with their landlords, came over in great numbers; James Gordon's History of Ireland, II. 241. and settlements on the Catawba, in South Carolina, dated from that epoch. The parents of Andrew Jackson, the late President of the United States, reached South Carolina in 1764. At different times in the eighteenth century, some had found homes in New-England, but they were most numerous south of New-York, from New-Jersey to Georgia. In Pennsylvania they peopled many coun- chap. IV.} 1763. ties, till, in public life, they already balanced the influence of the Quakers. In Virginia, they went up the valley of the Shenandoah; and they extended themselves along the tributaries of the Catawba, in the beautiful upland region of North Carolina. Their trai
the sole judge of elections. Gov. Thomas Boone to Lords of Trade, 15 Sept. 1763. Petition to the king of the Commons House of Assembly of the Province of South Carolina, in Boone's letter of 10 Sept. 1763. The arbitrary and imperious governor was too clearly in the wrong to be sustained; South Carolina to Garth, their South Carolina to Garth, their agent, 2 July, 1766. but the controversy which had already continued for a twelvemonth, and was now at its height, lasted long enough to train the statesmen of South Carolina to systematical opinions on the rights of their legislature, and of the king's power in matters of their privilege. The details of the colonial administraSouth Carolina to systematical opinions on the rights of their legislature, and of the king's power in matters of their privilege. The details of the colonial administration belonged to Halifax. No sooner was the ministry definitively established, than Grenville, as the head of the treasury, proceeded to redeem the promise made to the House of Commons of an American revenue. The revenue from the customs in America could by no means produce a sufficient fund to meet the expenses of its military
ncies of the state required that Great Britain should disappoint American establishments of manufactures as contrary to the general good. Ibid., 69. To South Carolina and Georgia special indulgence was shown; following the line of precedent, 3 Geo. iic. XXVIII., and 27 Geo. II. c. XVIII. rice, though an enumerated commoligible; or if the colonies themselves thought any other mode would be more expedient, he should have no objection to come into it. Letter of Garth, Agent of South Carolina, a member of parliament to South Carolina. that it was his intention, in the next session, to bring in a bill im- chap. IX.} 1764. April. posing stamp-dutiSouth Carolina. that it was his intention, in the next session, to bring in a bill im- chap. IX.} 1764. April. posing stamp-duties in America, and the reasons for giving such notice were, because he understood some people entertained doubts of the power of parliament to impose internal taxes in the colonies; and because that, although of all the schemes which had fallen under his consideration, he thought a stamp-act was the best, he was not so wedded to i
meetings among themselves; and on Saturday, the second of February, Franklin, with Ingersoll, Jackson and Garth, as agents for Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and South Carolina, waited on the minister, to remonstrate in behalf of America, against taxation of the colonies by parliament, and to propose, that if they were to be taxed, tpreme jurisdiction of parliament. The authority of Yorke seemed conclusive: less than forty were willing to receive the petition of Virginia. A third from South Carolina, a fourth from Connecticut, though expressed in the most moderate language; a fifth from Massachusetts, though silent even about the question of right, all she, south of Cape Finisterre; the prohibition on exporting their bar iron from England was removed; the rice of North Carolina was as much liberated as that of South Carolina; and rice might be warehoused in England for re-exportation without advancing the duties.. In executing the Stamp Act, it was further provided, that the reven
written this. But the opinion is only inferential. I know of no direct evidence. They were caught up by the impatient colonies; were reprinted in nearly all their newspapers; were approved of by the most learned and judicious on this continent; and even formed part of the instructions of South Carolina South Carolina to Garth, 16 Dec. 1765. to its agent in England. Thus revolution proceeded. Virginia marshalled resistance; Massachusetts entreated union; New-York pointed to independence. written this. But the opinion is only inferential. I know of no direct evidence. They were caught up by the impatient colonies; were reprinted in nearly all their newspapers; were approved of by the most learned and judicious on this continent; and even formed part of the instructions of South Carolina South Carolina to Garth, 16 Dec. 1765. to its agent in England. Thus revolution proceeded. Virginia marshalled resistance; Massachusetts entreated union; New-York pointed to independence.
Chapter 14: South Carolina Founds the American union. June—July, 1765. the essays of Freeman had appeared, and the sum- chap. XIV.} 1765. June. mons for the Congress had gone forth fromhe towns. The inhabitants of North Carolina set up looms for weaving their own clothes, and South Carolina was ready to follow the example. The people, wrote the LieutenantGover-nor Sharpe, of Maryllating or low, and knew not how to hesitate or feign. After two legislatures had held back, South Carolina, by his achievement, pronounced for union. Our state, he used to say, particularly attentivounded the trumpet, but to Carolina is it owing that it was attended to. Had it not been for South Carolina, no Congress would then have happened. As the united American people spread through the vn now extends, be it remembered that the blessing of union is due to the warm-heartedness of South Carolina. She was all alive, and felt at every pore. And when we count up those who, above others, c
n American Congress. chap. XVIII.} 1765. Oct. The delegates of South Carolina, the fearless Gadsden, who never practised disguise, the uprighetts, of Rhode Island, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and South Carolina; delegates named by a written requisition from the individual r. R. Livingston, jr., to the historian, Gordon. and Gadsden, of South Carolina, giving utterance to the warm impulses of a brave and noble nat Gage to Conway, 12 Oct. No colony was better represented than South Carolina. Her chap. XVIII.} 1765. Oct. delegation gave a chief to two at heat, till at last the Congress, by the hand of Rutledge, of South Carolina, erased from the declaration of rights the unguarded concessionsted on their rights in strong terms, the Congress purposely South Carolina to its agent, Garth, 16 Oct. 1765. employed a different style iith the virtual assent of New Hampshire, Connecticut, New-York, South Carolina, and Georgia, set their hands to the papers, by which the colon
ame rebellious spirit Sir J. Wright to Lords of Trade, 9 Nov. 1765. as prevailed at the North. The delegates of South Carolina were received by their assembly on the twenty-sixth of November. On chap. XIX.} 1765. Nov. that morning all the paisfaction at the conduct of their agents, it stood away, with swelling canvas, for England, bearing the evidence that South Carolina gave its heart unreservedly to the cause of freedom and union. Nothing will save us, wrote Gadsden, but acting togst fall with the rest, and be branded besides with everlasting infamy. The people of North Carolina Letter from South Carolina, 2 Dec. 1765. would neither receive a stamp man, nor tolerate the use of a stamp, nor suffer its ports to be closed. harmony, and the greatest prosperity. Delay made anxiety too intense to be endured. Every moment is tedious, wrote South Carolina to its agent in London: should you have to communicate the good news we wish for, send it to us, if possible, by a me
, who, nine months before had counselled submission, and who now shared and led the most excited opposition, if they do not repeal it, we will repeal it ourselves. The first American ship that ventured to sea with a rich cargo, and without stamped papers, was owned by the Boston merchant, John Hancock. At the south, in the Savannah river, a few British ships took stamped clearances, but this continued only till a vigilant people had time to understand one another, and to interfere. In South Carolina, the Lieutenant Governor, pleading the necessity of the case, himself sanctioned opening the port of Charleston. At New-York, the head quarters of the army, an attempt was made by the men of war to detain vessels ready for sea. The people rose in anger, and the naval commander, becoming alarmed by the danger of riots, left the road from New-York to the ocean once more free, as it was from every other harbor in the thirteen colonies. It was next attempted to open the executive court
reflections I have made in my retirement, which I hope long to enjoy, French Precis. beholding, as I do, ministries changed one after another, and passing away like shadows. Ibid, and Walpole, II. 262. A pause ensued as he ceased, when Conway rose and spoke: I not only adopt all that has just been chap. XXI.} 1766. Jan. said, but believe it expresses the sentiments of most, if not all the king's servants, and wish it may be the unanimous opinion of the house. Moffat. Garth to South Carolina, 19 Jan. 1766. I have been accidentally called to the high employment I bear; I can follow no principles more safe or more enlightened than those of the perfect model before my eyes; and I should always be most happy to act by his advice, and even to serve under his orders. French Precis. Walpole, II. 263 and 268. Yet, for myself and my colleagues, I disclaim an overruling influence. The notice given to parliament of the troubles in America, he added, was not early, because the firs
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