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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 506 506 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 279 279 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 141 141 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 64 64 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 55 55 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 43 43 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 32 32 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition.. You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

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dred, with Charles Thomson as his colleague. The assembly, on the very day of its organization, added Dickinson to its delegation in congress, Chap. XII.} 1774. Oct. and he took his seat in season to draft the address of that body to the king. During the debates on the proper basis of that address, letters from Boston announimpetuous; confident in their strength they scorned the thought of obedience, except on conditions that should be satisfactory to themselves. About the middle of October the brig Peggy Stewart, from London, arrived at Annapolis, with two thousand three hundred and twenty pounds of tea, on which the owner Chap. XII.} 1774. Oct. oOct. of the vessel made haste to pay the duty. The people of Maryland resented this voluntary submission to the British claim which their delegates to the general congress were engaged in contesting. The fidelity and honor of the province seemed in question. A committee therefore kept watch, to prevent the landing of the tea; success
convinced that not one thinking Chap. XIII.} 1774. Oct. man in all North America desired independence. He anot the wish of that government, Chap. XIII.} 1774. Oct. or any other upon this continent, separately or colletts, and extending it to Connec- Chap. XIII.} 1774 Oct. ticut and Rhode Island. The congress, when it adoptparliament or parts of acts, in- Chap. XIII.} 1774. Oct. eluding the Quebec act and the acts specially affect was adopted without opposition, Chap. XIII.} 1774. Oct. and inaugurated the abolition of the slave-trade: Weas yourselves, and we shall ever Chap. XIII.} 1774. Oct. esteem a union with you to be our greatest glory andthe privilege of thus expressing Chap. XIII.} 1774. Oct. their affectionate attachment they would never resiges. The cessation of the export Chap. XIII.} 1774. Oct. of provisions to the West Indies, of flax-seed to Irwhat he hath so nobly preserved. Chap. XIII.} 1774. Oct. Delightful as peace is, said Dickinson, it will come
f 1774 contained statesmen of the Chap. XIV.} 1774. Oct. highest order of wisdom. For eloquence Patrick Henrral assembly they had convened in Chap. XIV.} 1774. Oct. congress; and they remonstrated against his hostile able. A committee appointed on the twentyfourth of October to consider the proper time to provide a stock of pith power to alarm and muster the Chap. XIV.} 1774. Oct. militia of the province, of whom one-fourth were to lution of the highest questions of Chap. XIV.} 1774 Oct. state. Principles of eternal truth, which in their r and of business upon Catholics; Chap. XIV.} 1774. Oct. and they chose rather to depend on the clemency of tt churches and their revenues; so Chap. XIV.} 1774. Oct. that the Roman Catholic worship was as effectually ehurch asserted the unity, the uni- Chap XIV.} 1774. Oct. versality, and the unchangeableness of truth; and thlf. You have been conquered into Chap. XIV.} 1774. Oct. liberty, if you act as you ought. This work is not
Chapter 15: The governor of Virginia Nullifies the Quebec act. October—November, 1774. The attempt to extend the jurisdiction of Quebec to Chap. XV.} 1river widens into a plain. There they paused only to build canoes; having been Oct. joined by a second party, so that they made a force of nearly eleven hundred mens the sun was rising, the Indians opened a heavy fire on both Chap. XV.} 1774. Oct. parties; wounding Charles Lewis mortally. Fleming was wounded thrice; and the Vllowing orders tardily received from Dunmore, the little army, Chap. XV.} 1774 Oct. leaving a garrison at Point Pleasant, dashed across the Ohio to defy new battles march of eighty miles through an untrodden wilderness, on the twentyfourth of October they encamped on the banks of Congo Creek in Pickaway, near old Chillicothe. eed to deliver up their prisoners without reserve; to restore Chap. XV.} 1774. Oct. all horses and other property which they had carried off; to hunt no more on the
Chapter 16: The fourteenth parliament of Great Britain. October—December, 1774. it is the united voice of America to preserve their Chap. XVI.} 1774. freedom, or lose their lives in defd, in the hope of awakening the king and his ministers from the delusion that Chap. XVI.} 1774. Oct. Nov. America could be intimidated into submission. The eyes of the world were riveted on Frank as rightfully at least as the king of England, who, by law and the constitu- Chap. XVI.} 1774. Oct. Nov. tion, was bound to guard the franchises of his peopleagainst corruption. You will learn witst America and elected tories. Sometimes, when alone, Burke fell into an in- Chap. XVI.} 1774. Oct. Nov. expressible melancholy, and thought of renouncing public life, for which he owned himself unt be sufficient to conquer America; that if offered a command there, he would Chap. XVI.} 1774. Oct. Nov. refuse it; that he would vote for the repeal of the– four penal acts of parliament; and he t