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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Southey or search for Southey in all documents.

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n the meantime she went with her brother Hammond, of Quebec, to Europe, 1830, where she visited Southey, and by his advice got out a London edition of Zophiel. She was introduced to Lafayette, who woman of her time. On Zophiel; or, The Bride of Seven, Mrs. Brooks' fame as a poetess rests. Southey, The Doctor, Chapter 54. after quoting from this poem, adds: So sings Maria del Occidente, thee solitude of the soft twilight, longing for the presence of Zophiel, she sings that song which Southey quotes with such delight in The Doctor, claiming that it is not only equal but superior to Sapp infused with evil and impressive by the distinctively spiritual significance of the vision. Southey's enthusiastic appreciation is well known. Charles Lamb rose from the reading of Zophiel with the exclamation: Southey says it is by some Yankee woman; as if there had ever been a woman capable of anything so great! And still Zophiel remains unread and even unknown by name to the general rea