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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15., Lafayette's visit to Medford. (search)
on, and from his lips I had the story of his seeing this great man, and of the immense throng gathered there. A later hero that strongly appealed to me was Edward Everett, who died fifty years ago, January 15, 1865. In my first scrap-book, begun in childhood, I put a piece by T. W. Persons on the death of Everett. When in ripEverett. When in riper years I discarded this book, I took from it this one piece and placed it in another that I have today. When Edward Everett made the speech of welcome to Lafayette in 1824 at the old church in Cambridge, it is said he brought tears and cheers from his hearers, comprising one of the finest audiences in America, when at the closEdward Everett made the speech of welcome to Lafayette in 1824 at the old church in Cambridge, it is said he brought tears and cheers from his hearers, comprising one of the finest audiences in America, when at the close of his Phi Beta Kappa address he turned to the visitor whom America delighted to honor. Although these reasons may seem insignificant and trivial to you, yet the persons, places and events I have mentioned are to me the links of a perfect circle, a full round story of Lafayette's visit to Medford, and the people with whom he
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15., Some errors in Medford's histories. (search)
d-lots lay between the two locations. [Register, Vol. 2, p. 53.] Mistick fields.—The name of the land on the south side of Mystic river from Winter Hill to Medford Pond. Mistick fields were on the north side of Mistick river (Malden and Everett). The land between Main street, Medford, and Menotomy river was called the Stinted pasture. And between Menotomy river and Medford pond was called the Line field. Creek Head creek was called Nowell's creek. This river is felt to belong to Mood reason why the farm that Governor Cradock's servants had planted should be given a distinctive name. All the land on the north side of Mystic river, from Mystic pond to the creek (now known as Island-end river) which separates the cities of Everett and Chelsea, was called Mistick, or Mistickside; also, the land on the south side of the river was called Mistick. In 1631 the Court of Assistants granted to Governor Winthrop six hundred acres of land, to be set forth by metes and bounds, near