Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15.. You can also browse the collection for Rock Hill (Virginia, United States) or search for Rock Hill (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15., Some notes from my Scrapbook. (search)
eler purchased their estate (1660) they also acquired a right in the landing at the Rocks, next to Thomas Marrable's (Marble's) house. The Rocks are now know as Rock hill, and Thomas Marrable's house must have stood on the east side of Marble brook, and may have been (and probably was) the identical house set off to Katherine Wyer planting ground adjoining. Also seven acres of meadow commonly called by the name of Rock Meadow. . . . The name of Rock meadow is naturally associated with Rock hill. All the early houses of which we have any record were on, or near, a traveled way. There is no other location shown that so nearly points to the neighborhood oname of Rock meadow is naturally associated with Rock hill. All the early houses of which we have any record were on, or near, a traveled way. There is no other location shown that so nearly points to the neighborhood of Rock hill. It is possible that Dixes (or Dix's) house stood on the location above described. John H. Hooper.
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15., Some errors in Medford's histories. (search)
ys for the benefit of the public when the time arrived that they could legally do so. Some years ago the town of Medford claimed rights in the way and landing at Rock hill. A suit was brought to test the ownership thereof. The case was decided in favor of the owner of the land through which the way passed, upon the general groundthe bridge. [Register, Vol. 2, p. I.] The renowned Sachem of the Pawtuckets, Nanepashemit. . . [P. 72.] Mr. Brooks places the residence of the sachem on Rock hill. Of this there is no evidence. He also quotes from Winslow (see page 73 of the history), but he omits a very important part of the narrative. Winslow says, Weck river but did not explore it. Some historians locate the places described as being in Medford. It would have been impossible for these explorers to stand on Rock hill and ignore the presence of the Mistick river, which would have been spread out before them, both east and west. He may have first stopped opposite Winthrop'