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ther a quarter mile up stream on the Medford side of the river? And why was it a matter of town or public action, instead of private enterprise as were those of Broughton and Wade. Twenty-three years before, a verdict had been given against the former in favor of Symmes, whose meadows above Mistick ponds were flooded. Yet Prout, who was then (in 1698) proprietor, declared thirty or forty years of use, which covered nearly the time since Broughton began. We find no evidence that Broughton sought legislative action for liberty to build a gristmill, and perhaps his experience led to Medford's as above stated, in order to be safe from the consequences of rBroughton sought legislative action for liberty to build a gristmill, and perhaps his experience led to Medford's as above stated, in order to be safe from the consequences of resultant damage. A comparison of the vote in the Medford record with the petition in the Archives is interesting: Near and above Mistick bridge, says the former; A very suitable place. . . a little above Mistick bridge, the latter. There can be no question of its being above, or upstream from the bridge; but to our present s
is correct, it shows that while in all probability Joseph Prout built the dam, or allowed Jonathan Dunster to build it, Mr. Dunster must have the credit of building a new mill where those remains were found on this land. It is to be noted that Broughton's mill was built before he received a deed of the land from Henry Dunster. In the year 1822, Moses Robbins, a descendant of Jonathan Dunster, deeded to Cyrus Cutter one acre of marsh land, bounded southwest on Mystic river, northeast on Deacbridge was spoken of, evidently to distinguish it from the new bridge over the wears. It is doubtful if at that time the term Wear bridge, was in use. The bridge at the center was called Mistick as late as 1754. It is not at all probable that Broughton's mill dam was ever called a bridge. I was also interested, and somewhat amused with the view of Medford in 1839, as shown in the register, Vol. XXIII, No. 3, and in reading some of the remarks of the author of the article in explanation of
Brooks his land be the same more or less. Together with the Dwelling House fences, Trees fruit-trees on said premises with the Banks Damms Streams Wayes wch Mr. Broughton purchased from Mr. Henry Dunster. Mr. Henry Dunster See register, Vol. XII, p. 10. was the first President of Harvard College and father of Jonathan, the mill building on either side the river. Notice, at that time twelve years had elapsed since Medford petitioned the General Court, and fifty-four (or more) since Broughton built his mills, to which in his deed Prout referred not as mill, but as a millstead. With the lapse of years, the adverse decision of the court in the Symmes dhe Cambridge Comon in the above was the common or pasturage land of Cambridge, which then included Lexington in its bounds. Referring to Henry Dunster's deed to Broughton (see register, Vol. XIII, p. 10) we find conveyance of two Rods broad for a highway (from the sd Mills) to go too & fro betwixt the said Mills & Concord way