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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 26., Old ships and ship-building days of Medford. (search)
e sale, and after a short stay directed his course for Sitka. On the way he fell in with two United States vessels hiding from British cruisers. While there the Pedlar was seized by the Russians on a charge of selling powder to the natives but was released for lack of evidence. Peter Conly. Early Northern Pacific Voyages. ations of booty, and great was their disappointment when they found their prize had slipped through their fingers by transfer to British subjects. Hunt, in the Pedlar, took on board a few Americans who had not joined the North West Co. and preferred a sea voyage to the overland trip and sailed for New York. He is said to have was released. The story told at the investigation was that she had entered San Luis because she mistook her captor for a Russian ship to which a part of her cargo was to be delivered. She had both American and Russian passports. The departure of the Pedlar forever closed the business of Astor on the Pacific. Hall Gleason.
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 26., Old ships and ship-building days of Medford. (search)
built in Medford and sold in Hawaii for sandal-wood. The History of Medford says they were taken apart and sent out in the Thaddeus, but this is probably incorrect, as Morison in an article on the Hawaiian trade gives reliable evidence that they were sailed round. Morison. Boston Traders in Hawaiian Islands. Mass. Hist. Proc. Vol. 54, p. 29. The Jones was renamed the Inore. Among the Medford-built vessels engaged in the northwest and China trade at this period were the Arab, Louise, Pedlar, Lascar and Triton. Bryant and Sturgis sent the Sachem round to California for a load of hides. This was the beginning of a trade which grew to large proportions and which ten or fifteen years later was described so vividly by R. H. Dana in that masterpiece,Two Years Before the Mast. The brig Pilgrim in which he went out was built in Medford and the ship California which they helped to load was also. Dana gives the following description of her:— She was a good substantial ship, not