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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 268 268 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 42 42 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 38 38 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 36 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 33 33 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 28 28 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 26 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 25 25 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 30, 1860., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for 1835 AD or search for 1835 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

and in their belts tomahawks and scalping-knives.--Their fierce appearance alarmed the people as they marched through the country. They did good service in the battle at the Great Bridge in December following. Views of President Buchanan in 1835. There is great anxiety, in view of the secession movements at the South, and the momentous consequences likely to follow disruption of the Union, to know the views of President Buchanan on all the important points involved in the controversy doubtless be relieved early in the coming week, (on Tuesday next, probably,) when the President's annual Message will be communicated to Congress. Meanwhile, the following extract from a speech made by Mr. Buchanan in the United States Senate in 1835, will be read with interest: "The Constitution has, in the clearest terms, recognized the right of property in slaves. It prohibits any State, into which a slave may have fled, from passing any law to discharge him from slavery, and declare
Views of President Buchanan in 1835. There is great anxiety, in view of the secession movements at the South, and the momentous consequences likely to follow disruption of the Union, to know the views of President Buchanan on all the important points involved in the controversy now agitating the country. This anxiety will doubtless be relieved early in the coming week, (on Tuesday next, probably,) when the President's annual Message will be communicated to Congress. Meanwhile, the following extract from a speech made by Mr. Buchanan in the United States Senate in 1835, will be read with interest: "The Constitution has, in the clearest terms, recognized the right of property in slaves. It prohibits any State, into which a slave may have fled, from passing any law to discharge him from slavery, and declares that he shall be delivered up by the authorities of such State to his master. Nay, more, it makes the existence of slavery the foundation of political power, by giving