Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 21, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) or search for Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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ginia was, and' what the Southerners would have her be. He likewise expresses a lively hope and abiding confidence in the ultimate secession of his State. Fort Moultrie. The correspondent, in describing the fortifications, thus describes the works at Fort Moultrie: At Fort Moultrie, Sunday though it was, everything waFort Moultrie: At Fort Moultrie, Sunday though it was, everything was busy. The columbiads spiked and burned by Anderson, are all, with the exception of three, remounted on new carriages, unspiked, and as good as ever. Several of the merlons erected upon the parapet to protect the guns bearing on Sumter are completed.--The work is done in a most masterly manner. Barrels and bags of sand are so dFort Moultrie, Sunday though it was, everything was busy. The columbiads spiked and burned by Anderson, are all, with the exception of three, remounted on new carriages, unspiked, and as good as ever. Several of the merlons erected upon the parapet to protect the guns bearing on Sumter are completed.--The work is done in a most masterly manner. Barrels and bags of sand are so disposed and evenly packed as to give a solid masonry-like appearance. The merlons are very thick and impenetrable, and afford great security to the artillerists behind them. The process of constructing this sort of defence is in this manner: The bomb-proof surface of the parapet is turned up and rows of barrels of sand are pl
thusiastic memory the great services, the heroic courage, and splendid achievements of Gen. Nathaniel Greene, who led the chivalry of the South in so many terrible conflicts and glorious victories over the British. A Rhode Islander by birth, General Greene was sent southward by General Washington as his most reliable chief, and by his brilliant generalship and virtues so endeared himself to the people of this section that he ever afterwards resided in the South, and his descendants have ever been distinguished for their devotion to the honor and rights of the South. We have now before us a letter from a venerable lady, says the New Orleans Delta, the last surviving child of Gen. Nat. Greene, who has reached the advanced age of eighty, in which, addressing one of her descendants, she uses the following noble language: "Rather than hear that Fort Moultrie was taken from South Carolina, I would have myself dragged there and sit on the parapet until the last gun was fired."
r gazed upon. There before me was the full moon, the centre of a golden cross, as brilliant as herself. One column extended from the horizon nearly to the zenith, and the other, running horizontally through the moon, was also of immense length. It continued visible in all its grandeur and beauty for more than an hour. Everybody in our little city was gazing at the strange sight, and many were filled with fear. Some thought that the Union was to be dissolved, and others thought that "Fort Moultrie had been taken." At 9 o'clock it began to fade, but still we could see it distinctly, 9 1-2 o'clock a circle was formed around the moon, making an appearance like a cross inclosed in a circle. The cross was of luminous bars, and at the ends of the arms the rainbows appeared, not circular, but perpendicular. The large circle possessed all the colors of the rainbow, and was very brilliant, reflecting two smaller circles, one northwest and the other southwest. Oh, how we wished for y