Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 23, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for J. A. Scott or search for J. A. Scott in all documents.

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o partake of a collation, which was hailed as a lucky omen of future prosperity, and accepted Newlon. An adjournment took place to the Columbian, where they found an abundance of good things to eat and drink. After the close of this entertainment, the company escorted Capt. Wise to his quarters, and then, with Smith's Band, which had been engaged for the occasion, serenaded all the ex-captains, and had a "gay old time" generally. On their way back to the Armory, the Blues were saluted with a fine display of fireworks, by one of their old members, A. Antoni. The present officers of the Blues are — O. J. Wise, Captain. J. A. Scott. 1st Lieut.; Fred. Carter, 2d Lieut. C. B. Luck, Ensign. John W. McKiel, Quartermaster. Dr. S. L. Ingram, Surgeon. C. P. Bigger, 1st Serg't; J. F. Stagg, 2d Serg't. R. S. Sanxay, 3d Serg't. E. J. Levy, 4th Serg't. G. W. Jarvis, 1st Corp'l. T. B. Hewitt, 2d Corp'l. The Blues have 56 names on their roll, are free of debt and in good condition.
Gen. Scott. It seems to us that the common impression that Gen. Scott is a Coercionist, is not warranted by the "views"of that officer, lately submitted to the War Department, and published some days ago in this paper. In the event of a continuous line of secession, he distinctly disclaims the idea of coercion, and such continuity now exists. Moreover, his distinguished public services ought not to be at once forgotten, and some allowances should be made for a soldier's devotion to his Gen. Scott is a Coercionist, is not warranted by the "views"of that officer, lately submitted to the War Department, and published some days ago in this paper. In the event of a continuous line of secession, he distinctly disclaims the idea of coercion, and such continuity now exists. Moreover, his distinguished public services ought not to be at once forgotten, and some allowances should be made for a soldier's devotion to his flag. We believe that his heart is with Virginia, and certainly the spirit of his letter is far different from the hostile tone of certain Northern military expirants for the Presidency, whose huge threats of "blood and thunder"can only excite here contemptuous sarcasm and derision.