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ivision of the Territories between the slaveholding and non-slaveholding States by a geographical line. In the Senate, the propositions commonly known as Mr. Crittenden's were voted against by every Republican Senator; and the House, on a vote by yeas and nays, refused to consider certain propositions moved by Mr. Etheridge, which were even less favorable to the South than Mr. Crittenden's. A resolution, giving a pledge to sustain the President in the use of force against seceding States, was adopted in the House of Representatives by a large majority; and in the Senate, every Republican voted to substitute for Mr. Crittenden's propositions, resoMr. Crittenden's propositions, resolutions offered by Mr. Clark, of New Hampshire, declaring that no new concessions, guarantees, or amendments to the Constitution, were necessary; that the demands of the South were unreasonable, and that the remedy for the present danger was simply to enforce the laws — in other words, coercion and war. In this state of facts
The Daily Dispatch: January 25, 1861., [Electronic resource], A man killed by a lion at Astley's Theatre — a Thrilling scene. (search)
ive to Mr. Rust. Mr. Rust required an unqualified retraction. Mr. Dunn said he had made such an explanation as he thought it his duty to make. Mr. Rust.--"Very good." Mr. Ferry made an anti-secession and coercion speech, using very strong terms against the secessionists. He was opposed to any amendment to the Constitution. His whole speech was of the higher-law order, and full of denunciation. Senate.--The President filled the vacancies in the committees caused by the withdrawal of the Southern Senators. The Red River Raft Improvement bill was discussed and passed. The Pacific Railroad bill was taken up. Mr. Crittenden moved to postpone it and take up his resolutions, and remarked that he had been falsely represented as advocating coercion in secret session. His motion to take up his resolutions was defeated-- yeas 20; nays 26. The consideration of the Pacific Railroad bill was continued until the Senate went into Executive session.
From New Mexico. Independence, Jan. 22. --The New Mexico mail, with dates to the 31st of December, arrived here this evening. About eighteen days ago Major Crittenden, with his command from Fort Union, came across a large band of Kiowa Indians, near the Cunerone Springs, and a battle ensued, during which fifty Indians were killed, and among them their notorious chief, Santunk. They burnt up one hundred of their lodges, and took all their ponies and provisions, &c. None of Major C22. --The New Mexico mail, with dates to the 31st of December, arrived here this evening. About eighteen days ago Major Crittenden, with his command from Fort Union, came across a large band of Kiowa Indians, near the Cunerone Springs, and a battle ensued, during which fifty Indians were killed, and among them their notorious chief, Santunk. They burnt up one hundred of their lodges, and took all their ponies and provisions, &c. None of Major Crittenden's command were even wounded.