hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,286 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 656 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 566 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 416 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 360 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 298 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 272 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) or search for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 7 document sections:

n this city, and are intended for the State of Florida. W. Hampton Gibbes, late Second lieutenant in the army of South Carolina, has resigned. Rejoicings in Georgia. The signing of the Ordinance of Secession of Georgia was celebrated , and fired cannon over its grave. Let its tomb be marked with the simple inscription: Hic Jacet--The Past. The South Carolina Secretary of State. Col. C. G. Memminger, the Secretary of State in the South Carolina Cabinet, is a German, bornSouth Carolina Cabinet, is a German, born at Wirtemberg, Jan. 7, 1803. He was brought to this country when a child, and at the age of nine years, both parents having died, he became an inmate of the Orphan Asylum at Charleston. He was adopted into the family of Governor Thomas Bennett, by g the advocates of the doctrine of nullification in biblical style. He has filled various offices of public trust in South Carolina, up to this time. For nearly twenty years he was at the head of the Finance Committee of the Lower House of the Legi
ill not regard our constitutional rights, then, and then for the first time, arises the doctrine of secession in its practical application. A great man, who now reposes with his fathers, and who has been often arraigned for a want of fealty to the Union, advocated the doctrine of nullification because it preserved the Union. It was because of his deep-seated attachment to the Union; his determination to find some remedy for existing ills short of a severance of the ties which bound South Carolina to the other States, that Mr. Calhoun advocated the doctrine of nullification, which he proclaimed to be peaceful; to be within the limits of State power, not to disturb the Union, but only to be a means of bringing the agent before the tribunal of the States for their judgment. Secession belongs to a different class of remedies. It is to be justified upon the basis that the States are sovereign. There was a time when none denied it. I hope the time may come again, when a better c
ognized bond of Union between these States, has been entirely set at naught and trampled upon by a dominant sectional majority in the North, and the Chicago Platform erected in its steal, thereby destroying "justice," preventing "domestic tranquility," converting that which was intended for "defence" into an engine of destruction, and promoting, and designed to promote, the aggrandizement of one section at the expense of the dearest rights of the other; and, whereas, our sister States of South Carolina. Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia, for the defence of those rights and the institutions which now demand our action for their preservation, have respectively withdrawn from the said perverted "Union:" 1st. Resolved, That every sentiment of honor, every regard for the rights of her citizens, and every incentive of interest, requires that the State of Virginia should place herself by the side of her sister States of the South, and make their destiny her destiny, unless gua
Manufacture of falsehoods. More falsehoods have been invented and circulated during the last four months about South Carolina than have been told about all other subjects for the last twenty-five years. The forced loans, the tax of $16 a head on negroes, the alleged exactions upon Gen Aiken, the turbulent conduct of the volunteers, the suffering from want of food and coal, are but a few specimens of a thousand which have been manufactured out of the whole cloth, and never had the slightest shadow of foundation. It is humiliating to think that a class of writers exist in this country who earn their subsistence by deliberate slander, an article which they manufacture with no other care or scruple than to make it, like any other fabric, as complete as possible.
scussion of its various suggestions, and confine our remarks on it to the following extract: The Observer says: 'From South Carolina, already, we have the most contemptuous language addressed to Virginia, who is distinctly informed that she is not waever, than pronounce them in substance and effect grievous misrepresentations. It may be that some foolish person in South Carolina has used 'contemptuous language' in reference to Virginia; but the Observer, which is constantly telling the South thn Republic, unless it is the intimation that they desire and intend to re-open the African slave trade. The heart of South Carolina beats in warm, loyal, loving regard for Virginia. She has proved it in trying times. It was that more than anythingon" in whatever course the latter might judge to be best; and when Virginia said she desired nothing more to be done, South Carolina acquiesced; and now, if constrained by a sense of overpowering necessity, she takes action alone and of herself, one
The Daily Dispatch: January 25, 1861., [Electronic resource], The South Carolina Commissioner to Virginia. (search)
The South Carolina Commissioner to Virginia. --The Columbia, S. C., papers announce that Col. John S. Preston has received from Gen. Jamison, President of the South Carolina Convention, the appointment of Commissioner to the Virginia Convention.
From Charleston. Charleston, Jan. 24. --The offer of military services extended to the Governor of South Carolina by the Catawba Indians of the State, have been accepted. Hon. Jeff Davis, of Mississippi, has arrived here. Lieut. R. K. Meade, Jr., of Va., has returned to Fort Sumter. The Legislature has appropriated $50,000 for carrying on the present postal arrangement, if the Federal Government stops the present system. A Committee of Inquiry has been appointed on Carolina by the Catawba Indians of the State, have been accepted. Hon. Jeff Davis, of Mississippi, has arrived here. Lieut. R. K. Meade, Jr., of Va., has returned to Fort Sumter. The Legislature has appropriated $50,000 for carrying on the present postal arrangement, if the Federal Government stops the present system. A Committee of Inquiry has been appointed on what changes are necessary in the banking system of South Carolina. The Legislature will adjourn on Friday.