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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 49 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 30 2 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 21 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 20 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 18 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 17 13 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 15 1 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 14 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 26, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Byron or search for Byron in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: January 26, 1861., [Electronic resource], Citizens' State-rights ticket.-- Peachy R. Grattan, P. H. Aylett, Geo. W. Randolph. (search)
Byron's marriage. --Miss Martineau contributes to the latest Atlantic an excellent article on Lady Byron, proving the latter had more real heart than the poet of sentiment and of passion — her Lady Byron, proving the latter had more real heart than the poet of sentiment and of passion — her husband. The following account of the marriage will interest all readers. They were married on the 2nd of January. The wedding-day was miserable. Byron awoke in one of his melancholy moods, anByron awoke in one of his melancholy moods, and wandered alone in the grounds till called to be married. His wayward mind was full of all the associations that were least congenial with the day. His thoughts were full of Mary Chaworth, and the abroad as to the cause of this horror, one probably as false as another; and, for his own part, Byron met them by a false story of Miss Milbank's lady's maid having been stuck in, bodkinwise, between them. As Lady Byron certainly soon got over the shock, the probability is that she satisfied herself that he had been suffering under one of the dark moods to which he was subject, both constitutio