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The Daily Dispatch: January 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 29, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Virginia Douglas or search for Virginia Douglas in all documents.

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of the public service: Post-Office Department, Appointment Office, January 22, 1861. Sir --In answer to the inquiry in your letter of the 15th to the Postmaster General, he instructs me to inform you that you were removed from the office of Postmaster at Paducah because you announced yourself as "devoutly in favor of disunion," and it is not considered prudent to retain in the service of the Government men openly seeking its overthrow. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, Horatio King. First Assistant Postmaster General. John C. Noble, Esq., Paducah, Ky. As a rejoinder to the manifesto of a majority of the Virginia delegation, Senators Crittenden and Douglas, and Messrs. Malison, Boteler and Harris, of Virginia, of the House, have united in a letter to Hon. James Barbour, of the Virginia Legislature, giving assurance that the prospect of a peaceful and satisfactory settlement of troubles is better than at any previous time, and hourly brightening.
s abundant internal evidence that Clemens him self never wrote the speech) is to be disseminated at abolition expense for Virginia's destruction. Crittenden, Douglas, Clemens, Harris, and Millson, are to send forth a manifest to against the address lately issued by ten of our Representatives. What have Crittenden and Douglas Douglas to do with Virginia Douglas, Seward and Crittenden (mark the combination) are patching up a compromise. Will Virginia listen to them in preference to Hunter and Ro.E, Scott? Louisiana is out of this blessed Abolition Colon Texas follows suit immediately. On the4th of February the Southern Convention meets at Montgomery, a PrVirginia Douglas, Seward and Crittenden (mark the combination) are patching up a compromise. Will Virginia listen to them in preference to Hunter and Ro.E, Scott? Louisiana is out of this blessed Abolition Colon Texas follows suit immediately. On the4th of February the Southern Convention meets at Montgomery, a Provisional Government will at once be organized and in two weeks from to-day a Southern Confederacy will be in actual existence. There will be no reconstruction. Don't hope for it. It can never be for the simple reason that a reunion involves some foothold somewhere for the agitation of slavery. This the Republicans are compelle
as proper for him, in advance of the official declaration of his election, to take a prominent part in the direction of political affairs. The friends of the Union are much encouraged by the friendly responses to the invitations for Commissioners from the several States, to meet here in Convention on the 4th of February, and it is believed that its action will command the support of a large majority of both branches of Congress. The Fugitive Slave Law introduced in the Senate by Mr. Douglas is believed to be a thorough and effective measure, obviating "the objections" to the present statute and securing efficiency. Messrs. Benjamin and Slidell, since the secession of Louisiana, have taken no active part in the proceedings of the Senate. They will formally vacate their seats upon receipt of official information of the action of their State. The great point now aimed at by the friends of the Union is to avoid all pretext for collision by the seceding States, in the
Congressional. Washington, Jan. 28. --Senate.--Mr. Douglas introduced a bill amending the Fugitive Slave laws of 1793 and 1850. Cmpromise memorials were read and referred. The Chair announced the withdrawal of Senator Iverson, of Georgia, who stated in his communication that if Georgia was permitted to leave the Union in peace she would make an equitable division of the Federal assets; but if war ensued, she would abolish both public and private debts; if peaceable, there might be a hope of reconstruction; if war, then all hopes of the Union are at an end. A message was received from the President, enclosing the Virginia resolutions. The President urges the importance of the subject on Congress, and eulogizes the action of Virginia. He appeals to Congress to carry out her recommendation. Mr. Mason urged that they be printed. He said the object of Virginia was first to secure peace, and, second, to obtain the rights of all the States in the Union; or, f